Cutting and capping a gas pipe


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Old 05-11-06, 12:48 PM
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Cutting and capping a gas pipe

Is there any safe way to cut and cap a galvanized gas pipe where there may not be enough space to cut threads?

I'm trying to shorten a pipe which extends out of a wall. I was hoping to unscrew it from its nearest fitting and insert a shorter nipple, but the fitting is way back in a wall behind some air ducts and there would have to be serious demo work to reach it.

A plumber checked it and said even if you could unscrew the existing pipe, getting the nipple tight enough without being able to hold the fitting in place as you tightened it was problematical. He then gave an estimate for running a new pipe which was precisely $1,200 more than my $50 budget.

So, I guess the first question is: How much room to you need to be able to cut and thread a pipe? Can it be done within a 6" space?

If this is not possible, is there any way to cut the pipe and cap it without it being threaded?

Thanks for any suggestions.
 
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Old 05-11-06, 01:03 PM
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I can think of no way of capping it without threading it (thats safe). If you have enough room around the pipe, you could rent a 4 wheel pipe cutter and cut it off. Then cut threads on it with a rental tool. Most pipe dies take up about 3 to 4". A rental store should have all you need to do this. Good luck.
You will also need a pipe wrench to hold back on the pipe while you are threading it or the next joint may start turning on you.
 
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Old 05-11-06, 05:56 PM
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Thanks for the reply, majakdragon. I think you're right about the need for threads; I guess I was hoping there was some new way to do it without them.

Good tip too about renting the equipment. I can get everything for $34 for 4 hours. If I can do a little wood surgery and clear space for the cutter, that's the way I'll go.

Much appreciated.
 
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Old 05-12-06, 10:02 AM
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Gas pipe

One other thought is does the pipe continue into the basement?, if it does and you can get to it there, thats the place to cap it.
 
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Old 05-14-06, 08:57 AM
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shacko,

Thanks for the idea. The pipe has to be capped higher up though as one of its branches nearby is in use.
 
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Old 05-14-06, 10:25 AM
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I have dealt with gas lines for our restaurant, I realized when I cap a line for added protection I like to put a valve just before the cap. Just in case one fails, that is if you have enough room.
 
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Old 05-15-06, 01:41 PM
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Good suggestion, cbino. That's some pretty cheap insurance, especially when the cap is inside a wall that's going to be sheetrocked. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-17-06, 09:25 PM
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Not a good idea to set a valve inside a wall that's going to be sheetrocked (without an access panel). Valves should remain accessible.
 
 

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