Frozen Basket Strainer

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  #1  
Old 06-27-06, 11:43 AM
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Question Frozen Basket Strainer

strainer basket locknut seems to be cemented in place, has been there 23 years. tried the pliers/screwdriver on top to hold basket grate in place while hubby turned spud wrench below-- torque caused sink to warp so we quit (yes, turning it the correct way to left to loosen). WD40 didn't help. have some un-stick solvent working on it now and will try again tonight.

am thinking about using electric drill and a masonry bit to drill cracks into locknut to break it apart... have spent way too much time on what should've been a 'simple' replacement!

really frustrated . any suggestions, please???
 
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Old 06-27-06, 01:03 PM
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It sounds destructive, but you will have to replace the strainer, anyway. Reciprocating saw, metal blade, from the top, cut sideways through the strainer basket to the nut. This will relieve pressure and you should be able to get it off.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 01:46 PM
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If you have a Dremel, that would also work and might be less likely to damage the sink in the process.
 
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Old 06-27-06, 03:22 PM
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I would use drill with metal bit 3/8 or so size to cut hole in nut. then the metal should break the rest of the way off with some prying.
 
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Old 06-28-06, 06:17 AM
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Smile Thanks C., P., and R.

Thanks much to Chandler, Pendragon & Radar for suggestions! I also searched archives and found a couple others. Now, at last, I have some workable options for removing that darn locknut so I can replace strainer basket. All are good, I like the Dremel idea but don't have a Dremel --will try drill with that attachment for sharpening lawnmower blade --it'll be like a GIANT Dremel! Will tackle it as soon as time allows and let you know how it goes.

Thank goodness the other side of the sink (with the new disposal I put in last weekend, another adventure) isn't leaking and we can use that side until I get the other side fixed!

Forums are very helpful. Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-29-06, 05:12 PM
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That is why I don't like to use the plumbers putty method of installation under the rim of the basket as when you tighten the ring nut down it forces the excess putty not only out the top but down into the threads between the basket threads and locknut. Instead I use thin rubber ring gaskets under the rim. Then I put plumbers grease on the basket threads and also on the nut side of the cardboard gasket. I also use another rubber ring gasket under the sink as you should, also. When you hand tighten the ring nut and hold the basket in place how you want it, at the same time, as soon as it gets a bite, the basket will stay put and not try to spin, as it will with either plumbers putty or silicone caulk. I then final tighten with a plastic sink basket nut wrench. And while tightening, like I said, I no longer have to hold the basket in place. I always like to have the writing on the basket, and/or strainer crosshairs, being perfectly straight. I have never had a sink basket leak one drip, ever, in 20 years of replacing dozens and dozens of baskets. Not one. And if I ever DO have to replace one of my jobs in the future?: It wil take me a few minutes to change one back out.
 
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Old 06-30-06, 07:44 AM
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Question Thanks and Question for DaVeBoy.

What great advice! That's the sort of thing I like to get from these forums.

The new sink strainer which I bought has the paper gasket and a thick rubber gasket for under the sink. I really like your idea to put rubber gasket also above sink, under the rim of basket instead of plumbers' putty or silicone.

Question--I may not have been looking in the right place at my local Lowe's for those thin rubber gaskets. Should they be in the plumbing aisle? Where can I get some? I will also pick up some of that plumbers' grease though I hope it comes in a small container as I won't need a lot of it...

thanks again for sharing your experience and knowledge. I hope to get that darn locknut off this weekend with the drill/dremel idea and then proceed with putting in the new strainer.
 
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Old 06-30-06, 05:16 PM
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Here is the problem: My local Menards sells all the parts for changing out baskets, including the rubber ring gaskets which are 99 cents each. They are the same thickness as those they give you with the basket. On some sinks this is okay if they punch-pressed or cast the recess of the sink hole fairly deep. But if not...if you use one of thsoe rubber gaskets, it can cause the rim of the basket to sit up a hair and not allow all the water to drain out of the sink! But if you can find a plumbing store, and tell them that you are looking for thinner gaskets than (and bring one of the rubber gaskets with you) that are included with the basket...like the rubber gaskets included with some garbage disposers. THOSE are real thin and I have used those, and as thin as they are...they won't leak either.

I have also discovered when going through all of the rubber gaskets at Menards on the hook, that I have found some that are a little thinner than others! I naturally choose the thinnest of the bunch. I think they are about 1/16th inch thick, about.

You could first try one on ONE of the basins and run water in the sink and then see if the top of the rim is near-flush with the bottom of the sink, and if all the water drains out. I did one such job for my parents and did not have the ultra-thin gaskets and used the regular (1/16th inch?) ones and the water sits in the bottom of their sink out maybe 1/2 inch from the edge of the rim of the basket. But no harm done. Lime deposits can gather there, but will only do so if you never bother ragging out the bottom of the sink.

Let us know how this goes.

.................................................

And here is a tip: With a stainless steel sink that maybe has lime around the faucet deck or around the basket? Never use acid based lime cleaner on the stainless steel and go off and let it sit on there for any long length of time as it will gray-down the sink, permanently! The only cure for this is to intentionally spread the acid cleaner over the entire sink to gray-down the entire sink to eliminate the grayed-down run marks or blotch area.
 
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