Preventing flooding/washing machine hoses

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-02-06, 08:26 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Philly
Posts: 82
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Preventing flooding/washing machine hoses

Hello All,

We are putting in a new first floor laundry off our kitchen. Nightmares of washing machine hoses bursting has me planning out more redundant systems than a nuclear power plant. I just wanted to run some ideas by anyone out there and see what you think.

First, I am going to use steel mesh hoses. In fact, I found some at the local home center that have their own built in leak protection. It is all mechanical, but these hoses are made to somehow sense excessive flow and shut down. They seem to work. I tested them out in our basement and when not hooked to the washer they indeed shut down when you turn the water on. Only $25!

Second, I am purchasing the Intelliflow system witht he leak sensor. Essentially this is a electronic valve right at the water supply for the washer and turns on and off the water to the washer based on sensing a current draw from the washer (meaning it only turns on the water then the washer is on). This also comes with a leak sensor you put on the floor. If it gets wet, it shuts off the valves.
http://www.watts.com/pro/divisions/w...ntelliflow.htm

Third, I am going to install those pressure valve things (sorry, not a plumber and forgot the exact term) in the lines in order to prevent knocking on the lines when the water goes on and off.

Fourth, the supply lines to the washer will have their own dedicated manual shot off valves in the basement and when we go on vacation, they will be turned off (seems these awful washing machine hose leaks always happen on vacations!).

Fifth, though it might be ideal to build an entire basin with a drain for the washer to sit in, that is a lot of work and $, plus I cannot figure out how one would keep the trap in such a drain filled to prevent sewer gas. I mean, the drain would (hopefully) never ever have water going down it. So it seems any water in the trap would evaporate over a month or two. Home centers have these plastic basins to put under a washer, but they are kind of ugly and the wife will not go for that. So, I was thinking of putting a sort of drain hole in the floor below the washer and having that run through a straight pvc pipe into the basement (not finished) so as a final redundant system any leak getting by everything listed above would go through this drain to the basement that has a floor drain. However, this does not seem something that would meet any codes.

Any way, sorry for the long rambling post, but if any experts out there have any advice or comments, it would really be appreciated. In the mean time, those $25 leak sensing metal hoses are a great thing. I would recommend that everyone has at least that, even in a basement laundry.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-02-06, 12:35 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Deke: I just changed my washer hoses to the Flood Stop braided hoses, too. They will work fine with a dead flow, but won't work with a "leak". Shutting off the washer when not in use via the valve is the best thing. I also installed, for a customer, a Flood Stop sensor system on his main lead in line, so if any water accumulated around his water heater, washer, etc it would shut down the main water line. Here again, only as good as the pipes ahead of it. But a good line of defense.
INstalling the anti hammer units is a good measure to keep the pipes from hammering, and possibly cracking a joint.
I have seen in newer homes with washers in an upstairs location with a safety pan and drain. As far as I can tell, they just vent these things to the atmosphere with a flapper valve on the outside to prevent animal infiltration. Having a trap on them won't do much good unless you continually make sure the trap has water in it. For after all, you hope it never floods, right?
 
  #3  
Old 07-02-06, 03:55 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just turn on and off supply line at washer every time, and check hoses every two years and you should not have a problem. sound like your over killing the situation.
 
  #4  
Old 07-02-06, 06:43 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Philly
Posts: 82
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks Chandler. Anti hammer, yes that was the term I was looking for! Hey, I think I saw the Flood Stopper online. Do you like that over the Intelliflow? Looks better built from what I remember.

Radar, yes I may be overkilling, but I have read that the number one most common expensive water damage home owners insurance claim is from burst washing machine hoses. First hand, my neighbor had an *upstairs* laundy and the screams brought me and my wife over in time to see the water fall running down their stairway. At home, I have already dealt with water damage from a leaking roof (never again!). Maybe I am a little paranoid, but and I think I earned it! :-)
 
  #5  
Old 07-03-06, 04:14 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Actually the FloodStopper main line unit was purchased by the homeowner, and I just installed it. He hasn't called in a couple of years, so it must be working fine. The Washer hoses were at HD, and were quite inexpensive. I got one for the dishwasher as well.
I do remodeling, repair and restoration work, and will not take on a job until the water problem(s) are corrected. I don't correct them, I just repair the damage. I hate water infiltration.
 
  #6  
Old 07-03-06, 07:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Franklin
Posts: 11
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Sounds like you are on the right track, having work for a water damage restoration company for several years, washing machine hose were the second largest cause of damage. Second only to Ice Maker Lines. Many Insurance Adjusters recommend the steel braided lines and a local shut off for the water supply on both the washing Machine and Ice Maker. It is also recommended that a shut off valve be installed for the main water line, that is easily accessible, so that water can be turned off during prolong absences from home.
 
  #7  
Old 07-03-06, 07:55 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
We have alot of part time residents who abandon paradise and go back to Florida for the winter. I check up on their houses about mid winter and you will be surprised how many just go and forget to turn their water off. Most have been lucky. One not so lucky. Refrigerator icemaker developed leak thanks to a rat, and leaked all under a new tile floor, back through the living room all the way back to the bedroom. Needless to say, everything had to be replaced to the tune of several thousand dollars. Lessons learned.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: