washing machine drain pipes


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Old 09-02-06, 07:45 AM
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washing machine drain pipes

Several questions here. Sorry for the length but I find if I leave it short and sweet the pros ask for info I planned on putting in the first time.

I have an old top load that drains into a large double sink utility sink. When this machine drains it fills one side of the sink very quickly to near the top. the sink drains reasonably well but it does take a minute or so. The drain hose actualy raps around the leg of the sink because it's a little too long. Should I shorten this hose for less restriction on the washer pump? Heavy loads do come out wet but I'm assuming that's the belt or just a tired washer.

The sink has a short exposed 2" PVC pipe run into the 3" main that is only about 10' to 15' from the street sewer main. Overall the drain system is vented very poorly. There is a toilet in the basement that uses a vent pipe that terminates right next to the toilet. On that vent pipe is one of those nifty one way vent valves. Otherwise the only vent is an old 2" galvanized pipe that connects at the same point that the 2nd floor bathroom connects to the cast iron pipe that heads straight down to the basement. So no vent below the 2nd floor.

So would it make sense to put one of these local vents on the drain pipe for the sink so that it gets more air? It would seem to me that the sink itself would provide the air but I'm not really clear on the physics there.

NOW the big question. I'm adding a second washer to the system. This is a new front load so we should be talking about far less drain water BUT this could end up draining at the same time as the old top load. The top load sits to the right of the big double sink. The front load will be behind you if you are standing at the sink. I figure the easiest thing to do is to just drain the top load into the left hand side of the utility sink but the run will be a good four feet sideways before it hits the sink. Will this be a problem? Should I consider extending the drain that goes to the sink around the corner to the new washer?

So to recap, I want to make sure that both washers are setup with the least load on the pumps and to get suggestions on the best way to minimize the possibility that the drain system will be overloaded. Luckily if it does flood there's a floor drain right under the sink that goes out into street.

Thanks much.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 10:27 AM
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Post Washing machine drain issues

I am relocating my top load washer to another floor. My only problem is that I'm unsure if I can use a drain pipe for the washer. I'm afraid I'll end up like the others with water running back into the tub. My only drain is a multi-line drain that is 4.5 feet above the spot where I'm going to move the washer. Can the wash push water that far up into the air to drain properly? What else can I do?
 
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Old 09-23-06, 11:40 AM
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Can you smell sewer gas from the sink when you're using it or after a large volume of water is drained from it? If not then the vent is enough to keep the trap from depleting. To get a better flow you could disassemble the trap to the sink and clean it and the drain out. The drain line maybe 2 but the trap is probably 1-1/2 or 1-1/4 and partly clogged. How far does the 2 pvc drain for the sink run before it connects to the 3 stack?

You should really call the makers of the new washer for an answer to the last question. Id see no problem with a 4 foot horizontal run as long as there is fall to the sink in the horizontal run.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 10:42 AM
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for the most part my concerns were completely unfounded. The new Kenmore HE2+ uses so little water that both machines can drain into the utility sink at the same time with no problem at all. The bottle neck seems to be the drain opening in the bottom of the sink. The trap seems to be capable of handling both sinks draining at the same rate as one sink draining.

the real joy turned out to be installing the new washer hookup. I had taken a class on plumbing a couple of years ago but somehow sweating pipes on the bench is not the same as sweating onto 20 year old copper against 120 years old floor joists while standing on your head. At the very end when I thought I had everything watertight one fitting completely let go and in the five seconds it took to get the newly installed ball valve shut off I had a good sized flood. Luckily this is right next to the floor drain.

I did add a 6' extension to the drain pipe of the new washer. I'm still confused about the required height of the drain pipe. I suppose I can call Kenmore but I doubt I'd find anyone that could explain the reason for the height requirement. Maybe someone at Whirlpool would understand it better. The drain originates at the bottom of the washer and exits at the top so what I do with it after that seems to be irrelevant.

thanks
 
 

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