Copper to Polybutylene


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Old 09-28-06, 12:28 PM
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Copper to Polybutylene

The plastic manifold for my cold water distibution is made of polyB... compression fittings and several of them are cracking. I built a new manifold of copper but thought I would ask what is the best way to connect the poly to the copper. I havent sweated any connectors to the Ts yet so I could go with anything. I have had good luck repairing poly with brass compression fittings in the past but dont know if this is the best way to go.

TIA Jimmie

Please dont tell me I should rip it all out, that is not an option. Besides the pipe is 20 years old and the only problem I have ever had with it is the connectors going bad. pipe is as new.
 

Last edited by JimmieDee; 09-28-06 at 02:08 PM.
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Old 09-30-06, 08:36 PM
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If you configure the manifold with compression fittings, then the copper or nylon compressions should work just fine on the poly.
 
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Old 09-30-06, 09:18 PM
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I was hoping you would say that, I picked up the fittings and some quarter turn valves today. I am going to put valves at the manifold incase the fittings at the other end of the pipe fail before I get them replaced.

Whats the big failure point with the poly. The samples I have seen show serious oxidation on the inside of the fittings and the fittings are very brittle. I pulled out a section of poly pipe that fed a bathroom and replaced it with PEX. I did an "autopsi" on the pipe and it looked new. Is this normally what happens.
 
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Old 09-30-06, 09:23 PM
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Wink

From what I have ran into. Its always been the fittings and not the pipe.

ED
 
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Old 09-30-06, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc
From what I have ran into. Its always been the fittings and not the pipe.

ED
Yep that stuff is awfull though. They don't use it anymore to my knowledge thank god but you can still get replacement parts. I remember there were several lawsuits over it breaking and causing major flood damage. I myself had a compression joint pop off at like 3:00AM (of course). By the time they woke up and saw what was going on, major damage was done to the kitchen and finished basement below. Couldn't pay me enough to work with it again.
 
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Old 10-01-06, 05:28 AM
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Fortunately for me mine started as a small leak and only did some damage to some sheetrock in the garage. After I am finished with the repairs there will be a door or access panel there to get to the plumbing. I cant figure why in the hell people cram something like this in a wall and just sheetrock over it. It should be code to have access to the major distribution point in your plumbing just like it is for elctrical.

I have a week of vacation time coming up with nothing to do kids in school wife is working, so I guess I will spend a few days of it replacing fittings on the other end of the lines.

Took a look at my plumbing beneath the sinks and this shouldnt be a bad job at all, the way the pipes stick out. The only problem area to check is going to be for one bathroom and I have to get access to it through a wall in the kitchen behind the fridge.
 

Last edited by JimmieDee; 10-01-06 at 05:48 AM.
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Old 10-01-06, 05:59 AM
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After I chop a hole in my wall I was curious to what would be a good way to cover the hole and still have access later. Access is from behind the frige so I was thinking about using an Air Conditioning return duct cover, the kind that holds a filter. I have a couple.
 

Last edited by JimmieDee; 10-01-06 at 06:14 AM.
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Old 10-01-06, 06:20 PM
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I think everyone is right on with the pex problem. It wasn't the pipe as it is tough as nails. It was the fittings and the way they were applied. I carry a prime example on my truck to show people when they ask about it. the crimper was only placed on half the ring, and was skewed, leading to (luckily) a small drip, just prior to my customer going on a month vacation to Ireland. Can you imagine?! They normally would not have turned their water off when they left. Shudder the thought.
 
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Old 10-01-06, 06:28 PM
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plus the so called "compression" fittings did not really dig into the pipe. They have a little metal ring that keeps the compression union from sliding off or supposed to anyway. They can fail and slide off anyway which is what happened to me. Unfortunately these things have a way of going in the middle of the night when no water has been used in a while and the pressure is high.
 
 

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