Adding a T to gas pipe


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Old 10-10-06, 03:47 PM
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Adding a T to gas pipe

As I said in a couple of previous posts I recently remodeled my kitchen. I moved my gas range from one wall to another wall. Fortunately, the gas pipe runs directly under the new location of the range. Unfortunately I have to keep the pipe running to the previous location because that's where my dryer and grill are hooked into it at. So I need to create a "T" at the location directly under the range. I have a full finished basement, so I have plenty of access to the pipe, but my questions are...

1. Since it is threaded at two ends, I assume I have to cut the pipe at the location I want the "T". Do I then get the two pieces threaded at my local home improvement store?

2. Do I then get a T fitting for one piece?

3. Then how do I hook up the second piece to the unions at the other end for my dryer and grill?

Because the threads at each end would be in opposiute directions, I wouldn't be able to screw them in???

I'm confused, am I an idiot, or do my questions and my prediciment make sense?

Thank you!
 
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Old 10-11-06, 04:05 AM
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Not seeing what you see, here goes a blind generic solution. You will have to cut the pipe, shorten one the length of a nipple and union, and rethread them on the cut ends. A tee can be screwed onto one of the threaded ends and a short nipple into the other end of the tee. Now, you will need to install a union so you won't have to screw it backwards. Be sure to use whatever your local code requires for thread sealant. Some require pipe dope, and others allow the yellow gas approved teflon tape (which I prefer for non siezing).
 
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Old 10-25-06, 08:22 PM
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A note of caution on this one: I have done a lot of reno work over the years, but I do not do gas pipe work, other than disconnecting a stove to put flooring under it. I have installed gas fireplaces, but I always get a professional fitter to do the pipe work and pull the permit if required. Insurance companies frown on home owners doing these types of jobs, but lawyers can get rich from them.
 
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Old 11-02-06, 08:54 PM
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unions

unions under or contained within dwellings are illegal in calif. you need to use a right/left nipple and right/left coupling to join the pipes.
 
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Old 11-09-06, 07:01 PM
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As I said in a couple of previous posts I... full finished basement, so I have plenty of access to the pipe, but my questions are...

Do you mean "unfinished"? I am going through some gas pipe DIY project now and even with all ceiling joists exposed, it takes some puzzle solving skills to go around things..

1. Since it is threaded at two ends, I assume I have to cut the pipe at the location I want the "T". Do I then get the two pieces threaded at my local home improvement store?

instead of cutting, i suggest getting 2 new pieces. that way you will minimize any down time. from my experience, it is very important to dry-fit and layout the pipes to make sure you have everything before removing the existing pipe. some other materials you will need are:

1. pipe teflon (yellow, don't use white)
2. pipe dope (you can use either teflon or dope, but i like to use both)
3. 2 pipe wrenches
4. some galvanized 3/4" pipe hangers


2. Do I then get a T fitting for one piece?

assuming your existing pipe it 3/4", then get a 3/4" x 3/4" x 3/4" T-fitting. Jus t make sure to match the pipe materials to what you already have (most likely a black steel pipe)

3. Then how do I hook up the second piece to the unions at the other end for my dryer and grill?

Because the threads at each end would be in opposiute directions, I wouldn't be able to screw them in???

horizontal t-fitting ends have opposing threads. layout the T in the middle with pipes on each side then thread them in one at a time. you will note that they spin in opposite directions.


Just remember that threaded male ends always spin clock-wise.

Hope this helps! By the way, make sure to test out your connections after turning on the gas to ensure that joints are leak-free!

kevin
 
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Old 11-09-06, 07:16 PM
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How far did you move the stove? It may be easier to run the gas pipe from the old location to the new.
 
 

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