Need help replacing water softner valve...


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Old 10-15-06, 12:56 PM
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Need help replacing water softner valve...

The reason why I'm replacing it is because I think it's the valve that making my pipes vibrate in the walls.

My question is how in the heck do I remove the old solder, so I can take off the pipe?? I tried to heat it off with a Bernz-o-matic propane torch, but it doesn't seem like it gets hot enough. Am I supposed to hack off the pipe?

I would like to post some pics, but I see [IMG] code is off. And under the posting rules I may not post attatchments.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 01:15 PM
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You can post an "url"
 
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Old 10-15-06, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Rufus4
The reason why I'm replacing it is because I think it's the valve that making my pipes vibrate in the walls.

My question is how in the heck do I remove the old solder, so I can take off the pipe?? I tried to heat it off with a Bernz-o-matic propane torch, but it doesn't seem like it gets hot enough. Am I supposed to hack off the pipe?

I would like to post some pics, but I see [IMG] code is off. And under the posting rules I may not post attatchments.
My friend was trying to unsolder a pipe at work the other day. He had worked on it quite a while and had not made any progress. The problem was he was holding the torch too close to the fitting. The flame close to the burner is not very hot. Play with the position of the torch relative to the work and you will soon see where the hot spot is.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 02:51 PM
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I was holding the torch in different positions. I guess i have to keep playing with it until it melts off. I'm just worried that I might get the pipes too hot and start a fire within the walls. I'll try again tonight when I get back.

Here some pics.

Pre-plumbed pipe for a water softner:

http://img262.imageshack.us/img262/322/rdscf3622zz2.jpg


The exsisting valve side:

http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/9959/rdscf3626iu3.jpg


The other side of the pipe with the coupler soldered on:

http://img443.imageshack.us/img443/5329/rdscf3625gy8.jpg


The new valve I want to replace it with:

http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/7139/rdscf3627ov7.jpg


The tools I'll be using:

http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/5043/rdscf3628yl0.jpg
 
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Old 10-15-06, 03:10 PM
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You need to cut off the copper pipe loop, then open the gate valve and drain all water from the pipe. With the water drained you can heat the gate valve to the proper temperature to remove it. Next you will want to solder on the new ball valve. If you don't plan to install a water softener in the future you will need to solder up the copper pipe loop. If you do plan to install a softener, you should install a bypass valve now, while you have the pipes open.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 08:10 PM
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Thanks Rainbird. I was figuring that's what I was going to have to do, but just wanted to make sure before I start hacking. I was sure that the remaining water in those pipes were acting as a heatsink. I'm not going to install a water softner at this time so I'll just have to put that loop back on.

BTW, is it hard to install your own water softner? Do you recommend the pros takle that job?
 
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Old 10-16-06, 07:50 AM
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Installing a water softener is not difficult for a DIY person with moderate plumbing skills. It should be about a two hour job. One thing to consider is that you will need a drain available close by to pump the brine from the softener. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 10-22-06, 07:39 AM
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Ok, back to square one. What am I doing wrong??? I cannot get a good seal with the solder. I apply the flux, heat the pipes, apply the solder. The solder melts on the workpiece just fine, but it seems like it's applying pretty thin. So I go over it again and again with solder, but it doesn't build up. It just keeps running down the pipe thin. I turn the water back on and there are pinhole leaks in several different locations. How do I prevent this? How do I get a good bead of solder on there without it running so thin?
 
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Old 10-22-06, 08:32 AM
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Pipes MUST have no water in them. It is important that you clean each pipe and inside fitting with emery cloth so they are bright and free of dirt and grease. Apply your flux to each pipe and inside the fitting to be soldered. Apply heat with the propane torch to the fitting only. When the joint is hot enough apply the solder to fill the joint. You want the solder to be sucked into the joint by capillary action. Wipe away the excess solder with a dry rag.
 
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Old 10-22-06, 09:38 AM
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Thank you very much. I had no idea that you had to heat the fitting only, and let the solder be drawn in like that. I was stumped, and my wife was looking at me with that "let's call the pros" smirk on her face. You have restored confidence in our household. Thanks again.
 
 

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