No building codes for residential


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Old 12-01-06, 08:42 AM
R
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No building codes for residential

Hi,

Vermont has no building code or required building inspection on residential construction. Needless to say this leads to lots of folks getting stuck with shoddy and inferior work.
I fired my plumber during a recent new addition and remodel because of such shoddy work. Since there is no residential building code here it is hard to determine right from wrong.
I am handy so I took over the remaining plumbing which consisted of sweating some pipe and some drain line reconfiguration and repair.

The one I am most confused about is the fact that this guy cut 3 inches into the top of an existing carrying beam consisting of 3 2x8 pieces and 3 pieces of 1/2 plywood in order to get only a 1/8 pitch in a center island kitchen drain pipe. It then lays williy nilley over the tops of heat ducts pitching more then 6 inches. The total distance from the sink to the main outlet is about 30 feet. He said that 1/8 per foot is new code elsewhere and that cutting up to 3 inches in a carrying beam to get the pipe by is acceptable?
Help from any plumbers or inspectors in other areas of the country? If I leave the pipe passing 3 inches into the carrier from the top (Notched out) as I don't see much choice for alternatives except drilling straight through, which is too late now can I add a steel plate to the beam and bolt through or will it be ok? It is not sagging or anything but 3 inches into a 2x8 is deep in my view. the spacing between lally columns is pretty short I suspect because the carrier is ony 2x8 and plywood.
Any and all advice is appreciated
Rick
 
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Old 12-01-06, 12:54 PM
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Codes tend to vary from area to area. If you have no local building code office or inspector, you can contact your Vermont Building Code office. The State of Vermont does, indeed, have building codes.

Go to http://www.dps.state.vt.us/fire/licensing/Plumbing.htm for Vermont Plumbing Rules.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
Codes tend to vary from area to area. If you have no local building code office or inspector, you can contact your Vermont Building Code office. The State of Vermont does, indeed, have building codes.

Go to http://www.dps.state.vt.us/fire/licensing/Plumbing.htm for Vermont Plumbing Rules.

Hey Thanks. Good to know but the state still does not have inspectors for residential construction. Nobody looks at your foundation then says ok pass move on to framing etc. Commercially yes but not for residential. The question remains about the carrying beam? How do other professional plumbers handle a carrying beam running in the path of a drain line?
 
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Old 12-01-06, 08:08 PM
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You can read about notching & cutting weight-bearing members here:

http://www.ladbs.org/faq/info%20bulletins/building%20code/IB-P-BC%202002-007%20Wood%20cutting%20notching.pdf

And you might looks at some Simpson strong-ties to help shore up the existing notch.
 
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Old 12-02-06, 09:20 AM
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A friend of mine had a similar problem. She bought an old Victorian home that a bathroom had been added inside an upstairs bedroom. The frames were butchered to to fit the pipes in the floor. The solution here was to rip out the flooring and reinforce the joist with steel plates. A Lot of these plates hd to be run the full width of the room. I dont think you have anything this serious but metal is usually a good solution to problems like this. In your case I would probaly get a couple of pieces of flat steel about 4 to 6 ft long, 4 inchs wide and screw to the joist on each side to reinforce the joint. Cheap and easy fix.
 
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Old 12-02-06, 12:38 PM
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This is a great and handy forum. I am glad I registered. Thanks for the good advice and warm welcome!
 
 

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