fridge ice maker issues.

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Old 12-04-06, 10:45 AM
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fridge ice maker issues.

Seems simplistic I know, but maybe I am missing something here. Wife buys new refrigerator with an ice maker. I tap into water line no problems. Hook up copper tubing to ice maker, tighten her down, keep an eye on for 24 hrs., no problems. However, when I pushed the refrigerator back into position I suspect the copper tubing jiggled around the fitting and it started leaking between the sleave and the copper tubing at the connection to the ice maker. ( ended with water in the basement) I know this is not rocket science and that the copper tubing will wiggle a bit as the refrigerator is put back into place but how tight should this nut be. I was afraid to tighten it any further. I know enough about plumbing just to be a menace.

Any suggestions would help.

Thanks

Phil
 
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Old 12-04-06, 12:39 PM
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Compression fittings can be difficult to get "just right". When I install one, I usually tighten it initially just a bit more than finger tight. Then I turn on the water and tighten it a bit more until any "drippage" stops. That's about it. Don't know if yours is to tight or to loose... so, with nothing to lose, I would try tightening it a bit more, 1/4 turn at a time. If the leak gets worse, you really need to cut the fitting off and install a new one - cause it won't get any better regardless of what you do. The tools are cheap (tubing cutter - under $10.00, fittings - under $3.00) - and will get you where you need to be.
 
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Old 12-07-06, 07:40 PM
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ice maker hook up question

simple question, does the pierce go into the hot or cold. I am re installing an icemaker, new location, the plumber had it hooked to the hot and for some reason my husband questions this.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 07:15 AM
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Same Problem

I had the exact same problem, Worked ok till I pushed the stupid fridge back, then it leaked. The problem I have is that I am pushing it back into a space where I cannot fit- so there is no way to tighten it without pulling it out again and then pushing it back in- causing it to wiggle free.

I bought one of those 5 ft. flexible plastic braided water hose from home depot that I may try- anyone try this as an alternative to the copper- I just hope it will be more flexible and less likely to jiggle loose when I move it back. Thanks for your help- this forum is a godsend to homeowners.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 07:10 PM
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Smile

I'm sure you did this, but just in case.

I always put a 18"-24" loop or coil of the line near the refrig so as to allow the tubing to move before it disrupts the seal. I come out of the refrig., straight up, then coil before going to the inlet spot. This also allows you to pull out the refrig for cleaning etc. The tubing can flex without bothering the fittings this way.


Dale
Indy

Like thezster stated, hand tight, then little at a time. Check often the next few hours. LOTS OF HORROR STORIES OF THOSE THAT DIDN'T.
 
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Old 06-02-08, 07:44 PM
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Ice maker tubing success??

Originally Posted by purgasoj View Post
I had the exact same problem, Worked ok till I pushed the stupid fridge back, then it leaked. The problem I have is that I am pushing it back into a space where I cannot fit- so there is no way to tighten it without pulling it out again and then pushing it back in- causing it to wiggle free.

I bought one of those 5 ft. flexible plastic braided water hose from home depot that I may try- anyone try this as an alternative to the copper- I just hope it will be more flexible and less likely to jiggle loose when I move it back.
Thanks for your help- this forum is a godsend to homeowners.

Please tell me you used the plastic hose and it worked ! I am going crazy with this copper tubing...what a pain ! I am having the same problem as you did... please advise before I go out and buy more tools. Thanks!
Yvonne
 
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Old 06-03-08, 03:18 PM
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From personal experience (from a non-plumber's perspective), flexible copper is a pain in the ... to get right. I'd recommend either going with 1/4" plastic pipe and compression fittings, or a braided stainless steel line. Both are easy to work and install, and I've never had any problems with either. Hours of problems with copper lines.

As you probably suspected, the saddle valve should be on the COLD water line, not hot.
 
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Old 06-04-08, 05:21 PM
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hello all,

Here is my take on this issue.

First off, there is nothing wrong with copper if your ends are clean with no burrs, and snugged tight. Another plumbers secret I have is, SSssshhhhh!!! we don't want everyone to here...

I use a special grease called plumbers grease, faucet grease, or heat proof grease. This grease is what plumbers use to help grease the faucet repairs. It is heat proof so it does not melt. I put it on the ferule and the compression threads. It helps tin the tightening and STOPS POTENTIAL LEAKS !

Next I put 2 or 3 LARGE loops behind the fridge so you can move it back and forth easily.

Another IMPORTANT item is, most refrigerators have a special clip just above the water connection on the back of the fridge. That clip has a purpose. It is to help hold the pipe when the fridge is moved.

If you choose to use the plastic tubing, if it has a brass ferule, make sure you use a brass inset in the tube or it may not hold well. If it has a plastic ferule the insert is not needed but if you have one use it anyway.
And I think I have seen braided lines for refrigerators now. I have never used one but I think they are the greatest.

PS, self tapping valves are against plumbing code because they are dis-similar metals and cause corrosion.
 
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Old 06-05-08, 01:06 PM
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As you probably suspected, the saddle valve should be on the COLD water line, not hot.
Connecting to the hot water gives you clear ice. But do you want to pay to heat the water just for clear ice?

PS, self tapping valves are against plumbing code because they are dis-similar metals and cause corrosion.
I've heard this a lot, however, the saddle that goes around the pipe has a rubber lining that wraps around the copper to seal it and once you pierce the copper you have to back it out to let the water flow, so no dis-similar metals should be touching. I guess I don't get it.

Tom
 
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Old 06-05-08, 01:22 PM
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My inspector told me about the dis-similar metals. I thought the same as you, but who can argue with city hall...?

It is a nicer job without them, and I never said I never used them. But I don't any more.
 
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Old 06-09-08, 02:01 PM
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I thought the same as you, but who can argue with city hall...?
Agreed. They're the guys that pass you, so I do as they say.

Tom
 
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Old 06-12-08, 08:55 AM
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On a slightly different subject, but the same, I've just installed the plumbing for an icemaker, 1/4 off a 1/2 coldwater line, and the pressure seems waaayyyy too high. Is this just because of stepping down from the 3/4 to 1/2 to 1/4 ? Is the new refrigerator plumbing built for this ? Or should I just crack the valve (at the floor) ?

Brand new poster, and icemaker subject is front and center, I'm very impressed...
 
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Old 06-12-08, 09:20 AM
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The smaller the pipe gets, the higher the pressure appears. But the pressure will never go higher than the house pressure when everything is turned off. You should have no more than 80psi for the house pressure or you should have a pressure reducing valve installed so you do not damage anything, like toilets, dishwashers, washing machines or bad piping. Most items are designed for 80psi or less.

If you do not know your pressure, get a gauge that hooks up to your outside faucet or washing machine valve at Home depot for about $10. Run the water for a few seconds then put gauge on. Turn water back on and read gauge. Make sure nothing else in the house is running. If it appears as if the needle is moving a lot, leave it connected as those gauges have a needle that will record the absolute highest pressure in case of fluctuation.
 
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Old 06-12-08, 10:21 AM
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Mark, although I have not checked pressure with a gauge, I don't believe it to be high pressure from the street. Nothing else is out of the usual. With the smaller (1/4) sizing, it appears to have increased, though, and I wonder if the refrigerator and plumbing are built for this increase. I guess it is because all icemakers are necked down to 1/4, it's just not something I see every day. True ?
 
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Old 06-12-08, 10:59 AM
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The pressure will change, but look at it this way. take a hose and open the faucet, look at the stream. Then put your finger over the end, the water comes out further because you have restricted the line allowing less volume to expel from the hose but have increased the pressure. But the pressure can never get higher than the incoming pressure to your home when in a dormant stage.
Ice makers are designed for this.

There is a difference between pressure and flow rate.
 
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