Replacing washing machine shutoff valves


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Old 12-10-06, 03:28 PM
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Replacing washing machine shutoff valves

I want to replace the two shutoffs for my washing machine since they leak through the stems. I have never soldered before. The question is, do I just cut off the existing shutoffs and go with a shutoff with a compression fitting, do I learn to soldier, make sure my home insurance is paid up, and go that route, or just rely on the main shutoff(that also leaks from the stem) and forget the whole thing?

Thanks,

Eric
 
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Old 12-10-06, 04:50 PM
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Don't use compression fittings. They need to be soldered in, so a quick lesson in soldering, or call in reinforcements. I would also install the newer single lever control valve and cut it off each time I washed clothes. Nothing is as bad as busted hoses on Christmas eve.
 
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Old 12-10-06, 05:25 PM
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They leak through the stems? Did you try opening each valve and giving the brass stem nut a quarter turn clockwise. Stem valves always leak after a few years of use and quite often all they need is five minutes and five fingers with a 9/16/ or 5/8" wrench. Tightening that stem nut helps compress the stem winding and this may stop the leak.

Good luck.

bs5
 
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Old 12-10-06, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by bullshooter5
They leak through the stems? Did you try opening each valve and giving the brass stem nut a quarter turn clockwise. Stem valves always leak after a few years of use and quite often all they need is five minutes and five fingers with a 9/16/ or 5/8" wrench. Tightening that stem nut helps compress the stem winding and this may stop the leak.



Good luck.

bs5
I know this has worked for me.
Also make sure the water is all the way on or all the way off to avoid leaks.

By the way I always replace my hoses every 4 or five years. Its just cheap insurance. This past year I used some of the braided water heater connections to replace my washing machine hoses. I had to rig a right angle connection comming off the machine to get it to work. I hope I never have to wory about these hoses again. Still there is the drain.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 04:08 AM
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Yeah, I got spooky about mine, too, so I bought the floodstop braided hoses. Feel better already.
 
 

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