Gas pipe


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Old 12-12-06, 06:46 PM
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Gas pipe

Just purchased a 100 year old house and had the gas turned on. The next day had heavy gas smell. Pressure test determined there was a leak. Inspected under the house, maze of gas pipes running everywhere. The chances of finding this leak seem small. There are several old fireplaces that have gas lines to them that have been shut off over the years. Im thinking instead of searching for the leak, installing new line and removing all the old nipples that stick out of the floor. I have a gas stove, furnace, and water heater that need gas lines. I am planning on doing this job myself, any suggestions would be appreciated. My plan is to come off the meter run down the outside of the house 15 feet 90 degree under the kitchen right under the range where i will put in a T to connect the range, continue with the pipe to the utility room where I will run under the water heater with another T thru the floor to connect the water heater, another 5 feet to the furnace with a 90 deg elbow to the furnace. I will support the pipe along the side of the house and under the floor with strapping and brackets. Ok pitfalls, advice and support appreciated......
 
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Old 12-15-06, 05:26 PM
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Permit is required almost always. Most areas will allow a homeowner to pull the permit and then have the job inspected.

Check find out what material they require. Outside, exposed to the elements, some require galvanized, some require painted black pipe.

You would probably need to rent or purchase a pipe threader. Your job will need a lot of cut pieces. Get an 18" and 24 " pipe wrenches. Before making any connections to meter or inside appliances, cap off all the new pipes and pressurize to 12~15 PSI for the inspector.
 
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Old 12-17-06, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by 594tough View Post
Permit is required almost always. Most areas will allow a homeowner to pull the permit and then have the job inspected.

Check find out what material they require. Outside, exposed to the elements, some require galvanized, some require painted black pipe.

You would probably need to rent or purchase a pipe threader. Your job will need a lot of cut pieces. Get an 18" and 24 " pipe wrenches. Before making any connections to meter or inside appliances, cap off all the new pipes and pressurize to 12~15 PSI for the inspector.
best way to re pipe is start from scratch, make sure you know all the btu of all the appliances you have or that you may plan to install in the future so that you can size your main correctly. then measure the length of your longest run from appliance to meter and start your sizing from that. the way ive always done it is to come in from the meter with black pipe, sleeve the pipe through the wall with PVC and then make a black pipe manifold with all your different appliance runs taken off of it(reducing down at manifold T for the different size lines for different btu equipment) along with a drip leg of course, main shut off, union and then individual shut offs at each run. the flexible lines cost a lot more than black pipe but are incredibly easier to fish around especially in a crawl space. Minimal pipe cutting and threading is a huge plus when working by yourself.
 
 

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