Leaking Compression Fitting-What To Do?


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Old 12-20-06, 10:00 AM
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Leaking Compression Fitting-What To Do?

I recently purchased and installed an American Standard shower faucet set from Home Depot. It was special ordered. When I received it, I installed it and it leaked on the hot water side from the get go. This faucet has a swivel union (compression fitting) that is held on with a large nut that secures it to the faucet. I tried tightening the nut at first a little more, then some more again, then finally I tightened the crap out of it.. Nothing stopped the leak. The cold water side never dripped a single drop.

I then pulled it out and inspected the seat and the union.. Not machined worth a crap! It was evident it was never going to seal no matter what I did. So, I took it back to H/D, and ordered another one. After 2 weeks, I finally got the new one in. I opened it up at the counter before I left. Although the hot water side seat looked to be a little better machined than the old one, it still did not look as good as the cold water side seat. Reluctantly we took it home & installed it. Guess what? Cold water side sealed without a drip, but the hot water side leaks like a sieve no matter what I do.

Instead of taking it back and doing the waiting game once again, I was wondering if it is possible to solder the swivel union, and the nut to the faucet body. I won't ever have a need/reason to remove the swivel union in the future as I am using CPVC and it is simple enough to cut & couple should the need arise. Is soldering going to seal it up permanently? I was planning on pulling it back out, removing all CPVC pieces, cleaning it up, putting flux on it, and then soldering away. I know that I won't be able to solder the two machined faces where they meet (& supposedly seal). I was planning more on soldering the threaded connections to the faucet body, and the hole where the feed line penetrates the top of the nut.. Your thoughts???????
 
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Old 12-20-06, 10:03 AM
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Before I made it permanent like you described I think I would get in touch with American Standard and have them take care of it.

http://www.americanstandard-us.com/
 
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Old 12-20-06, 11:15 AM
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Unless you have personally called American Standard and had any type of success with that call-please DO NOT RECOMMEND to anyone else that they do that. I spent over 45 minutes on the phone with them and the only thing they can tell me is to bring it back, and special order another one. I explained that this is the 2nd faucet with the SAME problem, in the SAME location on each one.

I think she was reading from a script because all she kept saying is "return it and get a new one", "return it and get a new one".. She sounded like a parrot.

I asked her about soldering the old one, she said she was not a plumber and that any modification I made, or attempted to make, to the faucet would render it non-returnable, & non-refundable. And dare I say it... She then said "return it & get a new one! AAARRRGGGGHHHH!

I have an idea.. Why don't I return it, get my money back, buy from your competitor, and tell everyone I meet what a pile of pig $h!t your company produces.. and how excellent your customer service is-NOT!

Thank you for calling American Standard where our faucets are produced in a 3rd world country with ZERO quality control. Yes, we are the NEW American Standard!

Okay, my blood pressure is dropping now..

Looks like I am faucet shopping once again.
 
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Old 12-20-06, 11:43 AM
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Wow. Sorry about your bad experience.

I usually deal with the commercial end and have never had that kind of treatment. In your shoes I would probably return it and buy another brand too.
 
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Old 12-21-06, 11:04 AM
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Outsourcing of components and complete assemblies, usually to China, introduces significant barriers to quality on manufactured goods. Translation, both in language and understanding of modern quality systems, substitution of less costly but non-equivalent materials / plating and less reliance on automation / modern machining equipment due to the slaveishly low cost of labor all contribute to higher defects.

Additionally, Chinese manufacturers, once the product is on the boat, are almost never on the hook for bad product lots, warranty claims, scrap etc. This incents them to ship the cheapest junk possible, and incents US firms to sell whatever the customer will begrudgingly accept - even on the 2'nd return.

As long as US consumers base their purchasing decisions mainly on cost (Wal-mart, big box home improvement stores), the consumer wholly deserves the unmitigated crap that they receive, both from Chinese made "goods" and Bangalore supplied customer "service".

Please understand I refer to the consumer in the aggregate, not you in particular, I'm sure you're a heck of a swell guy - and no DIYer deserves the headache you stumbled into.

/rant mode/ <off>
 
 

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