Basement floor drain backing up

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  #1  
Old 01-02-07, 07:00 AM
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Unhappy Basement floor drain backing up

Hi,

I've read many similar threads about this problem but didn't find an exact situation so I wanted to ask... So we've got a basement floor drain that is backing up water and black crud whenever the following happens:

- dishwasher (on first floor) is used
- kitchen sink (next to dishwasher) is used
- washing machine (in basement) is used
- basement sink (next to washing machine) is used

Bathroom sinks (first floor or basements), toilets, showers don't seem to cause a problem. We've had the Roto Rooter folks clean this drain out once before but now the problem is back. One thing I noticed is that with the water that came up, there were some small food pieces in there as well (most likely from the kitchen sink or dishwasher presumably).

I have a 25' hand snake that I could try but I don't know if it's worth it. I also recall someone saying something about trying the outside cleanout plug, but I have no idea where/what that is?

Does this sound like a main drain problem? Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 01-02-07, 08:27 AM
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Floor drain stopage

Where did the Rotor-Rooter people clean out the line? this could be important information. I'm leaning toward the idea that you have a branch line that wasn't cleaned and this is causing your recurring problem. Best that I can do with the info.

.............................................................
"If all else fails, read the directions"
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-07, 08:40 AM
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Shacko, thanks for the reply. They cleaned out the floor drain (the one that is backing up now) over a year ago. Which would be the drain leading to the street I assume. The situation then wasn't nearly as bad as it was now - just running water in the wash tub will cause backflow now. Thanks again!
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-07, 08:59 AM
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Probably have roots in the drain, call Roto Rooter and save yourself the headaches and they give a 6 months warranty. Go to rotorooter.com and get yourself a coupon and save a few bucks. Have a nice day. Geo
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-07, 11:25 AM
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Well, I called a local Rooter service here (since they were able to come within an hour) and got it done. Though I think next time, I will just rent the power snake and do it myself! I'm embarrassed to say how much it cost me but it seemed excessive. Live and learn I guess. They offer a 60-day warranty but, really, what are the odds of getting another clog in 2 months??

Anyway, thanks for the replies! Much appreciated!
 
  #6  
Old 01-02-07, 05:31 PM
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I once had the same problem in a house where basement drain backed up. The vent stack was clogged. If problem reoccurs, keep this in mind.
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-07, 08:23 AM
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Floor drain clog

Originally Posted by parkers1 View Post
Well, I called a local Rooter service here (since they were able to come within an hour) and got it done. Though I think next time, I will just rent the power snake and do it myself! I'm embarrassed to say how much it cost me but it seemed excessive. Live and learn I guess. They offer a 60-day warranty but, really, what are the odds of getting another clog in 2 months??

Anyway, thanks for the replies! Much appreciated!
I know it is late to get back on your post, but if you have a recurring problem with a line it may be worth your while to have a video inspection to see if there is any damage to the line. Any damage will indicate that your prob. will come back. If you decide to have this done make sure that the contractor gives you a video. BTW, I know how much money these things will run into, thats why you don't want to do it over and over. Luck.

.........................................................
"If all else fails, read the directions"
 
  #8  
Old 01-11-07, 01:56 PM
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I just had my basement drain overflow this past weekend of course I was at work and my wife called to tell the basement was flooded. I called a rootor company and was quoted 280.00 to come out and fix the problem. So..... I took it upon myself and found a place that rented 100foot power rootor on sunday and did it myself. $42.00 It worked. I put the rootor cable down the main sewer line and went to towne. I must of done something right......

I was wondering what purpose does the drain in my basement serve. I was considering installing a backflow regulator or what ever its called, but after being told i would have to hammer my floor apart and dig around the drain I was alittle turned off. I figured I would just put a rubber plug into it to prevent this flood from happening again. Would that be a bad idea, the drain is not being used????/
 
  #9  
Old 01-11-07, 02:05 PM
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OK, well now I know the price I paid is accurate I guess It came in just over $270 when it was all done. I vowed that the next time I would do exactly what you had done - which is also exactly what the Rooter guy did.

Re: the backflow preventers (or whatever they're called, I've heard different names), some do require reconstruction apparently. There are others though (available at Home Depot, etc.) that are just rubber expansion pieces with a brass pin and rubber cup) that let water drain through but not water come back up. Though I guess, it will just come up elsewhere anyway....

I'm still trying to find out how useful they are. The first time our basement backed up, the guy said we should definitely get one. This last time (different guy), the guy said, "don't bother, they don't work"). Even if I did want one, they only make them for 2", 3", and 4" drain holes; ours is 2.5" so I can't find one that fits!
 
  #10  
Old 01-11-07, 02:30 PM
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go figure.... that would be just my luck that I can't find a plug in my size, but I'll look into it and see what happens. I'm just thankfull I don't have carpet down on my floors yet, this episode could have been really expensive.
 
  #11  
Old 11-21-08, 04:57 AM
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Plug in drain is a bad idea.

If your drain is like mine in the center of your basement that would be a bad idea to block it. My center whole is for ground water that comes up when there is too much water in the ground. If you block that whole and the water can not raise it will buckle your concrete floor, then you are looking at some real money. Your best bet is to go outside to your access drain pipe run your snake that you rented for 42.00 again with a water hose running also, that is so the water will run out anything that you break up with the snake, do that all the way out. You can then go to menards get a rubber boot that will fit tight into your center whole, also get a pvc pipe that will fit into the rubber boot, the rubber boot will fit into your whole that may or may not be perfectly round but will create a good seal, what you are doing is making a standing pipe. You want the pipe to go up about 6' if you can or as tall as you can. Water seeks its own level, so the water will go up the pipe but not go out on your floor. You don't have to leave it in there all the time just during heavy rains. I made one and haven't had a problem since. Good Luck
 
  #12  
Old 11-22-08, 12:20 PM
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If anyone's still following this thread, there is an item called Flood Guard that requires no demolition - just install it in the drain. It works and, at most, only requires a cleaning every once in a while.

Flood guards for floor drains - check valve to prevent flooding from FAMOUS PLUMBING SUPPLY

BTW, if there are any 2" floor drains they're very very rare. The floor drain attaches to piping which, in a basement would typically be 2" or 3". Try looking a little lower.

More: the advice above about getting a camera is good advice for a recurring blockage. There may be tree roots or a belly in the main drain.
 
  #13  
Old 02-14-10, 09:15 PM
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Wink Thanks for the info

I think this will fix my problem. I have a sump pump that runs as hard as it can when it rains and the pond next to me floods. The basement was used as a beauty shop in the 70's and I don't need a drain. I'm going to get the floor drain with the float and see what that does for the problem. We haven't had this much rain in years and may not again for a while so I may not know if I fix the problem for a year or more. Thanks for the great link.
 
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