Pipe reaming and erosion


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Old 01-06-07, 07:25 PM
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Red face Pipe reaming and erosion

How real of a problem is pipe or fitting erosion in home plumbing systems for copper tubing wasn't reamed after being cut, and then soldered to a fitting with rough edges? Is this more of an industrial issue, and how is it related to flow rate, water temperature, etc.? Just curious how fanatical I should be in the future when doing my domestic and closed loop heating plumbing in the future. There hasn't been much discussion regarding reaming and I'd like to hear from the pros.

Pete
 
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Old 01-07-07, 08:24 AM
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Reaming copper tube

Don't tell anybody, but most plumbers don't ream tube!! Just make sure that the tube is clean. There is no way this has anything to do with the temperature, the flow rate difference in a house installation is hard to measure; minimal. Don't over think it. If you are still unsure, just ream them out, lots of luck.

...............................................................
"If all else fails, read the directions"
 
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Old 01-07-07, 08:28 AM
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reaming

I've seen photos of sections of ells and tees that have been cut diagonally showing erosion attributed to the turbulance set up by improperly reamed tubing... Rather impressive and scary to look at!! On the other hand, like you mentioned, I've never seen a plumber ream or file tubing after cutting either! I imagine it is a real issue in some applications, just curious to hear other opinions.
 
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Old 01-11-07, 09:54 PM
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I ream every cut. In a situation where water is flowing constantly, like in hot water recirculation piping, un-reamed joints will cause pinholes, which I've repaired.

As to the severity of un-reamed cuts, lots of plumbers don't ream the pipe, and in most cases, it doesn't cause pinholes. How much of a problem an un-reamed cut will cause is directly proportional to the amount & velocity of water flowing through it.
 
 

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