copper vs. galvanized


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Old 02-27-07, 05:57 AM
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copper vs. galvanized

just an off the wall question regarding use of copper or galvanized to replace some old plumbing in the house.... does copper invite the same type of build up inside the pipe as galvanized does?
also, is it standard to run 3/4 inlet only to the hot water heater and then reduce all lines to 1/2 for delivery to particular faucet/toilet?
thanks all
 
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Old 02-27-07, 06:50 AM
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Copper may eventually leak, galvanized will eventually plug. You can do the whole house in " if you live by yourself... otherwise, best to only use " on the last fixture.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 07:06 AM
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1/2 in. on last faucet only?

ok, well i dont live by myself, in fact our home is a 2 story w/basement and the first and second floors are individual apts so....simple bathroom with tub/shower and sink, as well as kitchen sink in each unit with a laundry room in basement (hot & cold to washer and utility sink.) and you are saying its best for pressure purposes(more than one faucet being used at a time) to run most of plumbing in 3/4 except for the farthest faucet from heater?
thanks for help
 
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Old 02-27-07, 07:26 AM
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Note that 3/4" pipe has about twice the volume per foot of 1/2". This means that when you turn on the hot water [in the shower, for example] you'll have to wait about twice as long to actually get any hot water.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 07:34 AM
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I like to see the mains in 3/4" and the branches in 1/2" especially in a good sized home. That way the pressure loss when your wife flushes the toilet while you're in the shower wont be so noticeable.
 
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Old 02-27-07, 09:47 AM
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Galve. or copper

You never use galv. to replace plumbing pipe, if you have any in your system the idea is to remove as much as possible.

Unless you have a water problem, the copper will not build up like the galv.

Normal eye ball calulations are to run 3/4in. close to the fixture and take off a 1/2in. branch,[it won't cost that much more], lots of luck.

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"If all else fails, read the directions"
 

Last edited by GregH; 03-04-07 at 08:26 AM. Reason: Remove quote.......It is distracting to read comments a second time.
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Old 03-04-07, 06:53 AM
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Never use galvanized pipe. I recall a story with I was in eng, that when g pipe first became commerically avail for piping it was used in some large buildings. After a few years they all cloged, and it was not, in many cases feasable to replace the entire plumbing, so they had to implode the buildings ans start over.
 
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Old 03-06-07, 06:46 AM
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thanks for all the advice and knowledge people, i really appreciate it. pretty sure ill be in for a larger job than wanted but i want it right. thanks again all
 
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Old 03-06-07, 07:39 AM
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How is the access?

That's probably your biggest issue. It's also nice if you have room to run things parallel as much as you can. Then you just need to go as far as you can with the new system without actually tying it into anything. Then once you've done all you can do then do the big switchover, or a staged switchover if you have to. The more you can have done before the switchover the better.
 
 

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