Basement bathroom help !


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Old 03-04-07, 07:01 AM
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Question Basement bathroom help !

I'm in the planning phase of installing a bathroom in our basement. I'll need to break the concrete to install the rough-in and install a macerating pump since I'm below the septic tank. Can anyone recommend a good resource where I can get started on the research for the project, such as a good book with step by step pics on how to do this, or a similar web articles. Once I get the basics clear I'll be here with specific questions
 
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Old 03-05-07, 10:02 AM
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You might check the 'how-to' books at the box stores or the library. I also used the Taunton book 'Codecheck Plumbing' for tech details a lot, available from Amazon or some of the box stores.

Looking back on the home we just built, I went through some of the same issues when I did the rough-in for the basement bathroom. The first photo in the link below shows the basement bathroom rough-in and the sewer pipe going straight into the ejector pit across the basement.

http://hickoryhouse.blogspot.com/2005_12_01_hickoryhouse_archive.html

xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx

Hope this helps

Rick
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Old 03-06-07, 10:20 AM
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Thanks Rick. Looks like an ambitious project you undertook, makes my bathroom look trivial.

Your work looks someting like what I was thinking, so I have a couple questions.

1) for the toilet connect, is the pipe that comes out from the ground just a 4 inch (or 3 inch) pipe cut flush with the concrete floor, then a flange is glued to it on inside of the pipe. Then also some screws into the flange into the concrete for additional hold ?

2) Similar question for the Shower line. I thought I read somewhere that these lines are connected on the outside of the pipe, instead of the inside. If that is true must you surround the pipe with something so that you dont have to later chip away the concrete ?

3) I heard that for venting in a basement of an existing house, instead of going up to the roof, you can vent into the top of the existing main line. Anyone familiar with this technique ?

Thanks for the tip on the book (would these types of questions be shown in the book ?

Mike
 

Last edited by MikeRR; 03-06-07 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 03-08-07, 11:40 AM
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1. Toilet flanges are to rest on top of the finished floor. That is there proper position relative to the toilet outlet and ensures the proper squish of the wax ring. (If the flange ends up too low, there are spacer flanges to raise the flange surface back up.) My piping in the pics is 3" (cost reduction vs. 4", plus it has more than adequate DFU capacity) so I will leave the pipe long until our floor is finished (probably ceramic tile). Then I will glue a flange to the pipe and cut the extra off. (BTW, I like using an Oatey glue-on product in place of a wax ring. It glues to the bottom of the toilet and has a rubber nose piece that slips down the inside of the soil pipe. Also reusable.)

2. The drain line for the bathtub (left pipe in the photo) was protected from being filled in by concrete by a roughly 12" x 12" x 12" styrofoam box I made and placed down over it to keep a free area for future adjustment and connections to be made. Also, the P-trap in the photo is an adjustable one that has nuts at each joint to allow movement. The final drain connections to the tub will be made through an access hole/panel in a closet that backs up to the head of the tub. Before the concrete was poured, I tried to locate everything within 1/8" of what I estimated was final position, but there is still an outside wall to frame and a tub to install, so who knows how close things will really be. For your shower, you will a P-trap below floor level; you locate it in an open area for adjustment.

Yes, my shower drains connected to the outside of the 2" PVC pipe. I used Kohler K-9132-CP drains. If you go the Kohler web site and look at the installation instructions, you'll see that the PVC pipe is brought up above floor level enough to reach a certain distance into the drain assembly when installed in the shower (leave the pipe long when roughing the drains below the floor and cut it off when installing the shower). Then when the shower is in place, a rubber sleeve (a Fernco coupling) is lubed up with dish detergent and gently driven down into the space between the pipe OD and the drain ID. It works pretty slick. If the shower drain fitting will extend into the concrete floor, by all means sleeve the drain pipe before pouring concrete to give yourself room for the drain connection.

3. Concerning venting, if you can tap into "the top of the existing main line" you should be home free. But, that implies you can get a new basement vent up into the attic area. Typically one is lucky to be able to tap into a vent line in an existing wall above. Vents are sized based on DFU's, just like drains and supplies are. The book I referenced covers this.

Would your type of questions be covered in the book I referenced? Questions 1 and 2? No. Question 3? Yes, but by way of explaining the code and then you'd have to apply it to your situation.
 
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Old 03-11-07, 05:09 PM
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Red face Basement Bath

Mike and Rick,
This is my first posting on DIY, but I'm very interested in the topic as I'm a rookie trying to put a pump-up bath in the corner of our downstairs laundry. Well and septic here and the septic line starts right above the project at the kitchen sinks and runs along the wall out ot the tank but is at the ceiling of the basment hence the pump-up. Here's my progress thus far....
1. Built a plastic sheet room around where the cement needed to be cut. (Alot of duct tape!!). Dust was terrible. Had to hook up the leaf blowing through the dryer vent to clear the air. Worked pretty well.
2. Purchased the crock and pump seperate through a local warehouse here in Michigan called Nu-Way. About $300 cheaper than buying the completed crock/pump unit. But now I have to figure out how to plump it. The plastic crock came with a steel lid with two holes ready for the discharge and the vent pipes (2"). The recommened grinder pump is a Zoeller 267. With the crock, a 4" inlet protrudes out of the crock about 14" from the top. The outside of this protrusion of the crock has some molded in threads. There is a large rubber sleeve that fits from inside the crock through the inlet area. It looks like a 4" PVC pipe could be pushed into the rubber sleeve and protrude into the crock. Also a large plastic nut with handles looks like it threads over the inlet protrustion to compress the rubber sleeve after the 4" pipe is in the crock. Obviously, I need to slide the nut over the section of PVC that is entering the crock. I'm assuming I need to push the 4" PVC into the crock only about 1" past the inside edge of the crock? Can I just set the pump on the bottom of the crock? Looks like the pump has a inside threaded 2" cast iron outlet. Is there a fitting that threads into the pump and then excepts the PVC on the other end to go up through the lid? Do I use a thread sealer on that joint? I have a flapper check valve to install just above the crock. It also talked about a 3/16" vent hole in the 2" discharge line down close to the pump?

Talk to me guys. Thanks for your time. I have so many more questions!!!!

Signed - Bill The Rookie
 
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Old 03-13-07, 06:46 AM
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Thanks for your good reply Rick. It clear that you’ve done lots of prework. I’ll look for some books, including the one you suggested.

I went to HD and played with their plumbing parts to see how these fit together and a possible configuration. They carry Flotec parts/pump/basin for this job so thinking of going this path unless something else is recommended. I noticed that they carry an 18x30 and a 24x36 sewage basin. I assume it best to go with the bigger one, then adjust the pump on/off for a higher float level ?

Also these basins have a 4” inlet hole so I think I’ll be going with 4’ pipe. My distance is fairly short, ie 15 feet so cost should not be a bag factor for me and I suspect will eliminate a reduction, even if it’s a bit oversized.

As for the Shower I think I’ll just going to go with one of those 4x4 shower stalls unit/kit so I don’t think I’ll need to sleeve the pipe coming out of the ground, but rather line up the stall in it’s final position then mark the hole location, place then cement the pipe in place. Also cement all other pipes and traps in place.

For venting you read more into my comment that I had intended, ie “you can vent into the top of the existing main line”. I was told that was all that was necessary if you cannot find other vent line or go to the roof, which I cant . What abut the sure vent systems can they really be used (http://www.oatey.com/aav_public/why_vent.html) instead of installing a vent?

Anyone have any comments on using the flotec line of supplies vs others, or can suggest other brands to research ? I’d think that the manufactures would include some decent instructions of how to interconnect these parts but not much at Flotec homepage, anyone know of other manufactures in this area who may have better instructions ?
 

Last edited by MikeRR; 03-13-07 at 06:57 AM.
 

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