Cheater valves - proper venting


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Old 03-05-07, 10:39 AM
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Cheater valves - proper venting

Can you install cheater valves for venting up in attics? I live in a northern climate so it is usaually well below freezing for most of the winter months.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 08:17 PM
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Okay, I'll ask...

You are so close to actually having a real vent to outside air, why would you even consider a cheater vent in the attic?

This answer is really code dependent on your local codes. Usually, there is one full sized vent, same size as building sewer, that has to vent to open air. This condition must be met before cheaters are allowed.

In your particular case, you will probably find that you must increase the vent size 1 pipe size before it exits the roof. This is hoar frost protection so the vent does not close itself from freezing condensation.

You should also contact Studor (Studor vents) and ask them about their vents and cold climates. Don't install them but I'd bet they freeze closed if temps dropped enough. I'd be interested in what they have to say.

Call your local building code guys and ask some questions.
 
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Old 03-06-07, 08:50 AM
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Cheater vents

I would not use a cheater vent unless I was forced to, they are not true vents.

If you have to use one they should be installed close to the trap you are trying to vent.

If you are in the attic you should be able to connect to the main vent going out of the roof without the cheater.

Most attics are cold areas during the winter months, there is a good chance they wouldn't work then, I think its a bad idea. Your call, lots of luck.

..................................................................
"If all else fails, read the directions"
 
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Old 03-06-07, 12:09 PM
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Cheater(Studor) vents do work, but if your going as far as putting it in the attic you might as well just put in a regular vent. After a while Studor vents need to be replaced. A regular vent to the roof you never have to worry about unless its clogged.

I will say from experience that they do work. My wife and I purchased our first home(newly built) 4 years ago and how the plumbing vented never crossed our minds until I noticed one day that we had 2 plumbing vents on one side of the house but not on the side with the kitchen, washing machine, and guest bathroom. I asked a friend who is a plumber and he noticed the same thing, it turned out they venting one side of our house with 2 normal vents but they used studor vents on the 3 fixtures on the other side of the house. I wasnt happy with this set up and was advised that he builder did it because the code allowed it and it was cheaper. However, I had no problems with slow/clogged drains. The drawback is I will need to change them out if they ever fail. We are going to live with this set up right now, but whenever we need to have the roof worked on we will have a plumber put in a regular vent.
 
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Old 03-07-07, 02:40 PM
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The reason for it is because it is winter and I am finishing the basement. I was hoping to just leave the cheater vent in the attic - then wait for summer to poke through the roof. Then I could finish the basement now.

Below is straight from the Studor website: (I would it have looked it up before, but I didn't know what those things were called)

Installation Conditions
- Air admittance valves shall not be installed in supply or return air plenums, or in locations where they may be exposed to freezing temperatures.
- Air admittance valves shall be rated for the size of vent pipe to which they are connected.
- Installed air admittance valves shall be accessible and located in a space that allows for air to enter the valve
- Every drainage system shall have one vent that terminates to the outdoors in conformance with Sentence 2.5.6.2.(1).
- not less than 100 mm above the horizontal branch drain or fixture drain being vented,
- within the maximum developed length permitted for the vent, and
- not less than 150 mm above insulation materials.


Since it shouldn't freeze and be near insulation, I guess I will have to install the cheater valve before it gets to the attic, then this summer I will continue the vent through the roof and remove the cheater.
 
 

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