washing machine drains too fast

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Old 03-07-07, 03:38 PM
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Question washing machine drains too fast

This post could easily belong in the plumbing section, but I thought I'd ask here first.

My washing machine is a Frigidaire Crown, super capacity, and it isn't that old. I'm not sure how old but I'd bet it's less than 5 years. The previous owner bought it.

My problem is that i have an old house with old plumbing, and when the washing machine drains, the pipe it drains into over-flows.

Is there a way to restrict the out flow of a washing machine? to slow down the gallons per minute of flow?

Thanks for your time on this!
 
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Old 03-07-07, 05:44 PM
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No.
You can not slow down the flow of the washer.
The problem is not the washer it is the drain that does not have enough capacity.

I'll move this post to the plumbing section.
 
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Old 03-07-07, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
No.
You can not slow down the flow of the washer.
The problem is not the washer it is the drain that does not have enough capacity.

I'll move this post to the plumbing section.
This was my concern. It appears that the previous owner hooked up the washer drain to a drain for a sink.

So, the nearest pipe to the washer is one of those old cast iron behemoths that also serves as the vent.

Any chance that I could add a pipe to that? Or I have to replace the whole thing?
 
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Old 03-08-07, 10:44 AM
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Even though GregH told you, "No, You can not slow down the flow of the washer", this is precisely what you can do. I've done it to solve the exact same problem.

There is nothing sacred about a washing machine pump. It's just a centrifigal pump; if it has to pump against a little more restriction, it really doesn't care.

I lived in a house built in the mid 1960's and the plumbing drains just weren't done properly; not enough venting, and not enough flow capacity. The washing machine would overload its drain and start overflowing.

A solution to your problem is to put a restriction in your washing machine discharge hose to slow down its flow to what your drain can handle. Just don't slow it down to the point that your washing machine timer times out and goes on to the next step in the cycle! I think I used a copper reducer fitting (copper solder fitting) that would fit inside the discharge hose and reduce down to 1/2" or so. I placed the fitting inside the drain hose where it connects to the back of the washing machine and then put a hose clamp around it to hold it in place.
 
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Old 03-08-07, 11:02 AM
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Thanks Formula.

As with all projects this came about, I think, because I started one project that turned into this one.

I installed a new vanity that is now about 4 inches taller than the old vanity. I think this puts the current sink bowl taller than the washing machine drain pipe (which is on the same drain line as the sink).

The old sink would fill up with about 1/2 a quart of water whenever the washer would drain. Now that the new sink is higher, the first thing to over flow is the washer drain itself.

Formula, is there any reason why you didn't just hook the reducer to the end of the hose? I'm thinking that would be less steps than to hook it to the washing machine.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-08-07, 03:44 PM
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Hello,Couple of things you could try if you don't want to restrick the flow from the washing machine.
1 Install a utility sink and dump the water into that, also the sink is handy to have.
2 Extend the length of the pipe you dump the water into now Abs + a hubless connector. The correct length will put you back where you started.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 03-08-07, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Woodbutcher View Post
Hello,Couple of things you could try if you don't want to restrick the flow from the washing machine.
1 Install a utility sink and dump the water into that, also the sink is handy to have.
2 Extend the length of the pipe you dump the water into now Abs + a hubless connector. The correct length will put you back where you started.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
Thanks for the ideas. the house is too small to add in a utility sink, and I'm not sure what you mean by "Abs." Sorry for the noob lack of vocab!

The pipe is already as high is it can go without me tearing into a cabinet, but some sort of hub might work. I'm picturing a python swallowing a large rodent, if that's what you mean.
 
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Old 03-08-07, 08:22 PM
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The pump will wear down faster if it has to work harder.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:00 AM
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There is also a possibility that the drain is slightly clogged since machines send lint out in the drain now...
 
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Old 03-09-07, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by bambiblaster View Post
There is also a possibility that the drain is slightly clogged since machines send lint out in the drain now...

That was my first thought. I snaked that particular drain, and then ran a hose into with full water pressure. it worked fine. My washer, however, puts out more gallons per minute than my whole water system! yes, it's an old house and probably could use some new plumbing.

I've been thinking about this idea of reducing the flow, but what about the opposite: getting a bigger drain hose out of the washer? Or am I confusing water pressure with the rate of flow?
 
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Old 03-09-07, 02:25 PM
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Your problem is related to rate of flow which would be in gals/min.

I said that you can not restrict the flow of the drain but did not say why it wasn't a good idea.

The pump that is on a washer is designed for high flow rates at low pressure.
You most certainly are able to shove something up the pipe to slow it down but this will affect the pump by doing so.
The pump in a washer only is meant to pump up to the top of the U bent where syphon action helps the pump remove the water.
When you plug the outlet you will be overloading the pump and motor as well as causing a great deal of cavitation within the pump which will eventually erode it.
The lower flow of a plugged line could also cause a lint build up.

You need a longer term solution which would be to properly repair the drain.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
Your problem is related to rate of flow which would be in gals/min.

You need a longer term solution which would be to properly repair the drain.

in a perfect world, yes, but I can't afford someone to come in and do it, and although I can do it, It's gonna take me a while. Perhaps a weekend. And in the mean time, I have clothes to wash.

What if I added a longer hose?
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:16 PM
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I have had good results with THIS method, with no call backs to repace the washing machine pump or to fix an overflowing pipe:

You can buy this rubber adapter that is a reducer. The one end clamps over the stand pipe. The other end clamps over the discharge hose. Now when the washer drains, the force blasts through the stand pipe and likely will end up cleaning out the restriction down there.

What you can do though, if you fear possible long term damage, is to experiment with this for a bit. Then at a later date, undo the coupler and plug it back in the old way, to see if you have blasted your line clean.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:19 PM
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You came to the appliance forum to ask how you can restrict the flow from your washer so that an undersized drain could take away the outflow.

You got a direct answer to your question in which the suggestion was to use a copper fitting pushed into the drain hose to slow down the flow.
You also were offered the suggestion that doing so could cause a negative consequence to your machine.

Just pick the answer you like best and go for it.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by DaVeBoy View Post
You can buy this rubber adapter that is a reducer. The one end clamps over the stand pipe. The other end clamps over the discharge hose. Now when the washer drains, the force blasts through the stand pipe and likely will end up cleaning out the restriction down there.
Thanks for the replies.
I'm pretty sure there is no clog. It's simply that the previous owner hooked the washer drain to the wrong drain line (although I don't blame him, there really isn't anywhere else to hook up without climbing under the house. On second thought. He should have climbed under the house).

Also, the much of the piping is still metal, and I'm not too sure I want to suddently increase the pressure in there.
 
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Old 03-09-07, 05:28 PM
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Is the drain pipe at least 1 1/2 inches ID? And can you follow the drain pipe to see how long it travels before it converts to 2 inch or 4 inch?
 
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Old 11-21-08, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
You came to the appliance forum to ask how you can restrict the flow from your washer so that an undersized drain could take away the outflow.

You got a direct answer to your question in which the suggestion was to use a copper fitting pushed into the drain hose to slow down the flow.
You also were offered the suggestion that doing so could cause a negative consequence to your machine.

Just pick the answer you like best and go for it.

I think the problem with your answer has more to do with the attitude. I'm looking for a creative answer that won't do damage. If it's true that the pump will wear out faster (others seem to disagree with this claim) with a reducer, than I don't want to do that, but I also don't want to have tear out my current plumbing.

So, a little creativity is in order. I'm sure there are some clever, although temporary, that would help alleviate the problem.
 
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Old 11-22-08, 05:00 AM
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Where have you been for the last 20 months???

Hopefully by now you have washed some clothes.

You were offered a number of "temporary" solutions that could have some measure of success.
You need to understand that when you take a short cut there can be negative consequences.
You also need to understand that when you come to an open forum like this you will get a wide range of solutions from people with wildly different backgrounds and experiences.
You have a responsibility to sort out the answers given and pick what you feel would be the best solution.

You have not given us a clear description of how your current plumbing is configured.
Unfortunately we may not be "creative" enough to offer a workable temporary solution but we have also not been given enough information to suggest a way you can improve the plumbing in your house.

If you are able to take some clear in-focus pictures of your plumbing above and below the floor we may be able to offer some other solutions.
You would need to post your pictures on a free site like Photo Bucket and provide a link.
 
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Old 12-15-08, 01:13 PM
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Solution

Hi - I don't know why I am getting these emails although strangely enough I had this problem where there was an overflow problem with that rubber hose going into the drain pipe behind my washing machine (unless I did ask about it at one time?).

I know that sometimes there is just a hole in the wall for the rubber drain hose which comes out of your machine in the back (which has that curve on it in order to stick it into the drain hole or pipe), but mine is a pipe that goes from being horizontal against the wall to vertical up the wall just behind my washing machine. Upon the advice of a local 'well-known' hardware store guy, I just put a PVC pipe extension of about 12" onto that vertical pipe by using that plumbing cement (you can ask what it is a the 'well known' hardware store) and it was still low enough that my curved-end hose from my machine would go in and it worked! It gave the water just enough time to travel further and not back up! I haven't had one drop spillage - amazing, easy and almost instant fix!

Suessy
 
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