Refrigerator/Ice Maker hookup

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Old 03-12-07, 07:59 PM
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Refrigerator/Ice Maker hookup

I have a new refrigerator coming that has a hookup for water/ice. No connections exist. Current sink with water is about 13-18 linear feet away (rough guess). I was told my undersink valve may have a "nipple" on which to connect the water line. What does that look like? I'm somewhat handy but plumbing is definitely my weak point. Can I run a flex-line through the cabinets or under the floor (I'm in a townhouse with a crawl space) or do I need copper? Any help is greatly welcome.
 
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Old 03-13-07, 04:58 AM
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Sometimes a double valve is installed under kitchen sinks for ice maker hook ups. Older houses, not. I would opt for copper line, for several reasons. It is more stable than plastic, rats don't chew on it, and may be required by local codes.
Try to avoid using saddle valves, although you will be sold one if you ask for an ice maker kit. If you have a double valve on your kitchen sink, then you can run the copper line from the refrigerator, into the cabinet beside it and around to the valve. What type pipes do you have for cold water: galvanized, cpvc, copper? If you don't have the double valve, answer that and we will be better able to help with the hook up.
 
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Old 03-13-07, 05:26 PM
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I have copper pipes. I've read saddle valves are not the best way to go. I can run copper or flex line through the cabinets, and I thank you for the advice (no rats here, thank goodness). That's the easy part for me. It's the actual connection to the cold water that I'm hesitant about. The cold and hot water valves under the sink both have a little "knob" on the side. This is not the larger shut off control. More like a 1/4 inch capped point to the side that one may connect something else to. Water supply to the refrigerator perhaps? Or is this some sort of release point, though I can't imagine why. Is this the "nipple" I was told about? It is above the shutoff and below the faucet.
 
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Old 03-13-07, 06:53 PM
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It does sound like a connection point for a refrigerator. I just want to make sure it isn't a pressure relief point, so could you post a picture of it on a site such as photobucket.com and let us know the url. That way we can be sure.
 
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Old 03-14-07, 06:03 PM
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photo

Here is the URL for the photo: dragonstargraphics.com/valve.jpg

I circled the "nipple" I questioned. As you can see, the pipe is copper. This is the cold water pipe. I also have one of these on the hot water. Let me know if this is a relief or a connection for the water for my new refrigerator. Thanks for all your help!
 
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Old 03-14-07, 07:57 PM
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Nope, you have a gate valve with a relief, so what you will probably have to do is install another tee above the tee already in place, and install another quarter turn valve (pipe size compression fitting to 3/8" compression) in order to use the copper pipe you have for the fridge.
 
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Old 03-17-07, 04:31 PM
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Thanks for the clarification. Just thought of something else that may simplify things. I have a closet housing the water heater in the kitchen. Can I put a new T valve in the cold water inlet in that pipe and run that to the fridge for water and ice maker? Straight line from the closet to fridge then. Saves going through the cupboards to the sink inlets. Again, thanks for the help!

Ron
 
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Old 03-17-07, 07:08 PM
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Ron: Yes, and if it is closer, the less copper you will have to use. Just be sure to coil a little (5 or 6 rounds) of copper behind the refrigerator so you can pull the fridge out for cleaning or servicing.
 
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