Back up in washer drain pipe

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Old 03-17-07, 05:06 AM
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Question Back up in washer drain pipe

I have been in my house for 2 months and until the last 2 times I have used the washer, never had any problems. Now, after the first rinse cycle, the water is gushing out of the pipe where the hose from the washer is draining.
I have tried snaking the pipe and even the hose, but nothing seemed to be blocking these areas and I have not yet tried again to use the machine.
Any thoughts on what I may try to avoid having to use all my towels to soak up the water on the floor? (and therefore having to do more laundry!!)
 
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Old 03-17-07, 12:45 PM
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If you have the white corrugated type discharge hose that has the smaller diameter end, there is a (gray?)rubber coupling that you can join up the discharge tube to the drain pipe on the wall so the water HAS to be forced down the drain without backing up. It has two clamps.

Others here have given opinions that you don't want any kind of possible back-pressure restriction, as that icould be hard on your machine's pump.

Do as you will. You also have the choice of temporarily doing this also, to see if that clears out whatever gook might be reducing the wall thickness in the drain pipe.

It's possible that your machine puts out an extraordinary gpm's of water and a 1 1/2 inch stand pipe is not sufficient. Is the top of your standpipe about 40 inches up off the floor? Could you describe in detail the drain piping behind the washer?

If you have the larger solid black rubber discharge hose whose OD is almost the same size as the drain hole, there are ways of improvising with clamps, pipe, tape, silicone caulk that sets up, or whatever to seal the discharge end to the drain pipe in the above described mannor.
 
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Old 03-22-07, 12:47 PM
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Cool

I think we can all agree you have a stoppage in your drain line. Unless you snaked the entire length of the line, you probally didn't get it cleared. The blockage could be 20 feet down the line.

One way of clearing it (sometimes) is doing what DaVeBoy said and use the pressure of our washer pump to force it down the pipe. Of course, this does put pressure on your pump and washing machine pumps weren't designed for this. If you do this on each load you wash, your pump will wear out prematurely.

What I have done in the past is to use the supply line from the washer to run water into the drain line. Just turn the valve off, diconnect the line from the washer and insert it into the drain line. Turn the valve back on full and see how long it takes for the water to start to flow over the pipe. This will give you a rough guess how far down the line the clog is at. The long it takes, the farther the clog is down the line. Note: Sometimes the washer hose will not put out enough water to back up (partial clog), in this case you may have to drag a garden hose in from out side. In this case it is nice to have someone there to turn it on and off.

Once you have the drain filled with water you can try to seal it with out hands, while the garden hose or fill hose is in it. Sometimes this is all the pressure it takes to flush the clog loose.

If that doesn't work, go to the box store and get a "clog-bladder" (I don't know what the real name is for these things). It is a rubber bladder that connects to the end of the hose. You place it inside the drain line and turn the water on. As the water goes through the bladder, it expands and seals itself inside the drain line. As the drain fills with water the bladder causes pressure to be applied to the clog. An in most cases will clear any clog in a washer line. Note: Sometimes you have to fill the drain with water, using an open hose, prior to using the bladder. The bladder will not put out the volume of water an open hose will, but it will equal the pressure of the hose.

One other thing I have seen folks do: Is to stick the washer hose all the way down into the drain pipe. Your drain hose from the washer should hang on the top of the drain pipe, it shouldn't go down into the drain line but mayber 4 to 10 inches. If you have the line in all the way down, you are blocking the P-trap and causing the problem.
 
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Old 03-22-07, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Trying2Help View Post
I think we can all agree you have a stoppage in your drain line. Unless you snaked the entire length of the line, you probally didn't get it cleared. The blockage could be 20 feet down the line.

One way of clearing it (sometimes) is doing what DaVeBoy said and use the pressure of our washer pump to force it down the pipe. Of course, this does put pressure on your pump and washing machine pumps weren't designed for this. If you do this on each load you wash, your pump will wear out prematurely.

What I have done in the past is to use the supply line from the washer to run water into the drain line. Just turn the valve off, diconnect the line from the washer and insert it into the drain line. Turn the valve back on full and see how long it takes for the water to start to flow over the pipe. This will give you a rough guess how far down the line the clog is at. The long it takes, the farther the clog is down the line. Note: Sometimes the washer hose will not put out enough water to back up (partial clog), in this case you may have to drag a garden hose in from out side. In this case it is nice to have someone there to turn it on and off.

Once you have the drain filled with water you can try to seal it with out hands, while the garden hose or fill hose is in it. Sometimes this is all the pressure it takes to flush the clog loose.

If that doesn't work, go to the box store and get a "clog-bladder" (I don't know what the real name is for these things). It is a rubber bladder that connects to the end of the hose. You place it inside the drain line and turn the water on. As the water goes through the bladder, it expands and seals itself inside the drain line. As the drain fills with water the bladder causes pressure to be applied to the clog. An in most cases will clear any clog in a washer line. Note: Sometimes you have to fill the drain with water, using an open hose, prior to using the bladder. The bladder will not put out the volume of water an open hose will, but it will equal the pressure of the hose.

One other thing I have seen folks do: Is to stick the washer hose all the way down into the drain pipe. Your drain hose from the washer should hang on the top of the drain pipe, it shouldn't go down into the drain line but mayber 4 to 10 inches. If you have the line in all the way down, you are blocking the P-trap and causing the problem.
I like your first idea. That really is the way to go.

Regarding the clog bladder: Trouble is with washer backups, the discharge rate is a lot...like 15-25 gpm's or something like that. The 'clog bladder does not allow that much to get through the slit in the rubber device, unfortunately (although the shorter the hose section you use, the more water volume you will probably get...like if he were to put it on the end of the washing machine supply hose). These are great for forcing stuff through a line, if it is really jammed up withk something...but when you need full wall-to-wall diameter to handle the velocity of the discharge hose, the clog bladder may not do it. But...trying won't hurt either in case he has a bad obstruction way down the line, like you said, that will clear out. (*I* personally use those clog bladders a lot.)
 
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