Are there offset fittings for this?


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Old 03-20-07, 07:33 AM
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Arrow Are there offset fittings for this?

I'm going to add a standpipe to the laundry sink drain for our washing machine. The current piping is cast iron embedded in the slab that comes out to galvanized pipe with a brass trap and upwards with a galvanized vent. I'm going to replace the drain section an tap in using PVC from the galvanized connection below the trap to somewhere a few feet up on the vent.

The problem I'd like to correct is that the cast iron was set away from the wall a little too much, so from about 3 feet high to the floor, the pipes create an ever increasing bulge in the sheetrock. At the bottom it's about 3/8".

Is there any type of offset PVC fitting I can use to correct this so that the pipe is concealed in the wall without a bulge? If not, are there any tricks to achieve this?

Thanks guys!
 
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Old 03-20-07, 08:28 AM
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Pipe bulge in wall

From what I understand from your post it looks like the original wall was not wide enought for the iron, the only way to fix this is to do major demo., I think that your best bet is to live with it unless you want to get into major construction, sorry for the negative, lots of luck.

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Old 03-20-07, 10:30 AM
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No... it's only a 2" pipe in the wall. The cast iron was placed wrong at the bottom (in the slab) so that it makes the connecting galv. drain pipe too far forward in the wall cavity. As it goes up in the wall, the drain/vent pipe continues to slope back in to the cavity and the bulge tapers away to about 3 feet where it just about flat.

When I cut out the drain secion I will have a few feet from the stub in the cast iron to the remainder of the vent to try and correct the problem. That's why I want to know if there are any fittings to correct this.

Anyone know?
 
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Old 03-20-07, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by syakoban
I'm going to add a standpipe to the laundry sink drain for our washing machine. The current piping is cast iron embedded in the slab that comes out to galvanized pipe with a brass trap and upwards with a galvanized vent. I'm going to replace the drain section an tap in using PVC from the galvanized connection below the trap to somewhere a few feet up on the vent.

The problem I'd like to correct is that the cast iron was set away from the wall a little too much, so from about 3 feet high to the floor, the pipes create an ever increasing bulge in the sheetrock. At the bottom it's about 3/8".

Is there any type of offset PVC fitting I can use to correct this so that the pipe is concealed in the wall without a bulge? If not, are there any tricks to achieve this?

Thanks guys!
Rather than unscrewing your existing out of plumb cast drain/vent line (which might continue up and out the roof?), ...is the wall it is in a narrower-width wall where instead of altering the plumbing, you could put another layer of sheetrock over it and simply dig out the back side of the sheetrock that is now laying over the pipe? To pull this off, first you would need to cut the EXISTING sheetrock that is bulged, vertically along both sides of the pipe, upward, about 2 feet or so, so that when you REMOVE that piece of (aproximately 2 1/2 inch wide x 2 feet high) sheetrock that is bulged over the pipe, then the sheetrock on both sides of the pipe (that is out of plumb) can now be hit and/or screwed back against the wall. Then, cut new sheetrock for this wall (if it is a narrow width wall area) and gouge out the sheetriock on the backside so that the hollow you create will nestle over the pipe and not cause this new piece of overlay sheetrock to stick out.
 
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Old 03-21-07, 07:41 AM
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Bulge in wall

If the original installation was not set in the wall the bell for the cast iron pipe is outside the finish wall line, there is no way to fix this with off-set fittings; i.e. if you offset the fittings the bell will still be out of the wall. I think that the other post had a good idea, pad the wall out, if this won't work you will have to break up the concrete, luck again.

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Old 03-21-07, 11:20 AM
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Thanks guys. The added drywall won't work - the wall is 20 feet long, has a door, window, and baseboard on it.
 
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Old 03-21-07, 04:52 PM
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Drats!

How about making an offset in the wall then. You know...where you fir out a small section of wall around your pipe the needed amount, from floor to ceiling
Fiddling with that cast? plumbing there will be a nightmare, I think.
 
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Old 03-22-07, 10:58 AM
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Cool

Building the wall out may be the best idea....a lot less headaches and you may be able to hide the new pipes.

Seems if you build a "false wall" out about 4 to 6 inches you can: get rid of the bulge, hide some pipes behind it and build it to a height to have a small shelf above washer/dryer and sink to clutter up! Wife will love it!
 
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Old 03-22-07, 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Trying2Help
Building the wall out may be the best idea....a lot less headaches and you may be able to hide the new pipes.

Seems if you build a "false wall" out about 4 to 6 inches you can: get rid of the bulge, hide some pipes behind it and build it to a height to have a small shelf above washer/dryer and sink to clutter up! Wife will love it!
ANOTHER good idea. Yes...the shelf(s) could butt right up to the false wall, perhaps, to look like this was a well thought out plan.
 
 

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