Pipe Water Test

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  #1  
Old 03-31-07, 08:14 PM
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Smile Pipe Water Test

I just finished replacing the sewer line outside my house. To pass inspection, the city requires a water test "with 5 foot of head." I found out that means part of my sewer line has to extend 5 feet above ground/slab level, and I have to fill it to the top with water. If the water level drops, I have a leak, and I fail inspection. Every time I have attempted this, I found I have leaks. Therefore, I have to remove my test ball (to get the water out of the line so that I can fix the leak(s)). To remove the test ball, I have to unscrew the the cap on the top of the test T fitting. When I do this, a huge amount of water comes gushing out & fills the trench I have dug. The problem with this is that it makes a big muddy mess and, when I get ready to do the water test again, I can't tell where the leaks are because the ground is equally wet everywhere. It would be nice if I could find a way to have the water NOT fill up the trench. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 04-01-07, 07:44 AM
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Testing sewer line

The thing that has me confused about your post is "unscrew the cap on the top of the test T fitting", a test tee should be a continous run in the sewer and waste system, there should not be a cap on top of it. If you clarify I might be able to help, sorry.
 
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Old 04-01-07, 08:21 AM
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Try placing the test plug on the "upstream" side. You will not need a cap.
 
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Old 04-01-07, 10:40 AM
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You are going to be dealing with about a gallon of water in a 4 inch pipe, every 18 inches of run. Either you could syphon it out into a deeper hole you dig, or buy a cheap pump that has small in and out hose for pumping, or you could estimate gallons and dig a deeper pit at the low end of the line...as a thought.
 
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Old 04-01-07, 02:06 PM
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Thanks, notuboo!

I tried notuboo's suggestion, and it works well. The only problem with it is that it doesn't allow you to check the joints that are downstream of the test ball. This, however, is only a minor inconvenience since most of the joints are still upstream of the test ball. Thanks!
 
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