Washing Machine Hook up- Valve questions

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Old 04-12-07, 05:21 AM
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Washing Machine Hook up- Valve questions

1) With these kinds of valves (turnwheel connector attached to copper water supply), is it best to leave the valves ALL THE WAY open or only halfway? I just got steel braided hoses and I want to leave the water supply on to the washer all the time

2) Because I had used rubber hoses before, my normal practice had been to turn the water on and off as needed. However, over time the valves started leaking around the turnwheel. So, went to home depot and bought a comparable piece, took the rubber gasket out, and swapped it into my old valve. Works great, no leaks. This is ok, right?

3) Correect me if I'm wrong, but teflon tape is NOT required for nuts/threads in the parts of the valve itself...only where the valve connects to the copper water supply, correct?
 
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Old 04-12-07, 10:21 AM
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Wash machine

No. 1. Wash machine valves should be off when the machine is not in use.

No. 2. It will not matter what type of hose you have connected, they can all burst. Read the info. that came with the machine.

No. 2 1/2. They make a valve that has a lever that will shut off both lines at the same time, this is what you need.

No. 3. Most of the time that is correct, lots of luck.

.................................................................................
"If all else fails, read the directions"
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:12 AM
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Re: 21/2

Yeah, would love to get one...unfortunately my hot and cold water supplies are at two different heights...dont imagine I can put a shutoff valve on a diagonal, right?
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:21 AM
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Wink

I just got steel braided hoses and I want to leave the water supply on to the washer all the time

I would and do. Let them open all the time with the new hoses you have there now.
 
  #5  
Old 04-12-07, 11:52 AM
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Check out this article:

http://www.laundry-alternative.com/washing_machine_hoses.htm
 
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Old 04-12-07, 11:56 AM
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There are hoses available for washing machines (and other appliances) that have built-in flow shutoffs if the hose breaks (it has to be a major rupture, not a slow leak).

There are also electrical devices that can sense when the washer is off and automatically shut the water off via solenoids at the faucets. Solutions via technology, but at a premium cost, too. These are also available as leak sensors that go under the washing machine that do the same thing.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:52 PM
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Thumbs down

Yeah, I bought those hoses w/ the built in shut off valve. The flow is terrible and I am returning them. Electronic sensor is good idea though.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 02:57 PM
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I have the FloodSafe hoses on my washer with no flow problems. I also installed a FloodSafe whole house electrical sensor on the cold water line with a sensor on the floor near the water heater and appliances. If any water accumulates on the floor the sensor sends a signal to the coupling and the latch switch opens and the valve closes cutting off all the water to the house. Hope I never see it in use.
 
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Old 04-13-07, 06:02 AM
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That's exactly the kind of product I am looking for actually, will check it out. Are you allowed to post a link to it?
 
  #10  
Old 04-13-07, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
I also installed a FloodSafe whole house electrical sensor on the cold water line with a sensor on the floor near the water heater and appliances. If any water accumulates on the floor the sensor sends a signal to the coupling and the latch switch opens and the valve closes cutting off all the water to the house. Hope I never see it in use.
Will this turn off the fuel source to the water heater as well? Otherwise, if the water heater tank fails, and the water supply is cut off, doesn't this create a dangerous situation where the burners/elements are trying to heat an empty tank?
 
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