Drain Line Relocation


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Old 04-13-07, 06:12 PM
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Drain Line Relocation

I have a cast iron sewer pipe that runs diagonally overhead from one end of my basement to the other end where it joins with the sewer line from another bathroom, drops through the slab and exits the back of the house.

I'm trying to refinish the basement and this pipe is right in the way of everything. Unfortunately, it's not feasible to drop it down and run it under the slab because it wouldn't have enough slope.

But is is possible to drop it and run it outside the house and through a trench to connect it to the sewer line outside the house?
 
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Old 04-13-07, 08:56 PM
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It's all a matter of slope -that stuff everyone had problems with in 6th grade. You-now-what flows down hill! Now if you can be sure that it can do this with at least 1/4"/ft of slope (I'm sure to get grief from someone on this), knock yourself out!
 
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Old 04-14-07, 05:39 AM
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Sounds like a pretty big chore... and, depending on your basement ceiling height - might be more work than you want....

If (IF) your ceiling is high enough to build a soffit around it - you have a chance to get creative.... If it were me - and the ceiling was high enough - I'd build a soffit around it on the diagonal - and build another "dummy soffit" at a right angle, making a big "X" and giving my ceiling some "personality".....

Of course, if it's too low, then that option is out....
 
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Old 04-14-07, 12:15 PM
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I just finished a basement. We tried to come up with some viable options for the 4 separate bathroomwaste pipes that were hung below the joists. We ended up moving them (tucked them between joists)so that we had only one main drain to deal with and we built a soffitt around it.

I'm not sure about burying a separate waste line outside. Do you have septic or city sewer? You might run into code/inspector problems. What will you do for cleanouts?

Whatever you do try to keep your slope around 1/4" per foot. I'm not a plumber (hopefully one will step in here), but I believe 1/4" per foot is an optimum. Too little slope and the waste won't drain, too much slope and the liquids will drain too fast leaving the solids behind to eventually cause a problem.
 
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Old 06-03-07, 07:18 AM
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I talked with a couple of plumbers and found that it's acceptable to run a waste pipe outside and tie in to an existing sewer line. It's just a lot more work which is why it's not generally done.

Fortunately, the slope on our house facilitates the work. The code is that a clean out has to be installed at least every 100' and when there is a 90 degree turn.

Rerouting in a soffit was the preferred solution but it was not feasible in our house based on where a door needed to go. It's going to be much better without the overhead waste line to deal with.
 
 

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