Reuse old flare connectors on shower faucet?


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Old 04-18-07, 11:21 AM
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Reuse old flare connectors on shower faucet?

I've never dealt with copper flare fittings, and in my 1950's house, the shower faucet is connected in this manner. I love the idea of not having to cut pipe and sweat joints, but can i trust the old connector? Would I use any kind of sealant (teflon?) between the copper flare nut and the brass faucet assembly?

Thanks!

Chris
 
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Old 04-18-07, 07:39 PM
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Yes, flared fitting may be used again. They need to be absolutely clean on the mating surfaces. a drop of oil on the back side where the nut turns against the flare is a good idea. Do not over tighten, just enough to keep it from leaking. Absolutely no sealant or teflon tape.

Flared fittings are uncommon in residential plumbing. Are you sure you don't have ferrule (compression) fittings?
 
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Old 04-18-07, 08:23 PM
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I very well might. I don't plumb much so I wouldn't recognize one frmo the other from the outside (I've heard of them, though).

If so, does that change things as far as simply disconnecting the old and reconnecting the new?
 
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Old 04-18-07, 08:41 PM
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Nope, doesn't change the instructions.

Here is a picture of a flared fitting:

http://sdcollins.home.mindspring.com/Flare%20Nut-Fitting.JPG

This is a picture of a compression fitting. The ferrule is the brass barrel-shaped object on the copper tubing between the fitting and the nut. It slips on over the end of the tubing (after first slipping the nut on) and when the fitting is first tightened (about one and one-quarter to one and one-half turns beyond hand tight) the ferrule is crimped onto the tubing and cannot be removed.

http://www.scary-terry.com/ggshooter/comp_fitting.jpg
 
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Old 04-19-07, 10:28 AM
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Ok, thanks for the pictures!

My situation appears to be 1/2" flare fittings b/c the nut is a similar 'cone' shape as the flare fitting in your picture. Then again, I haven't unscrewed it yet to make sure that it's not a compression fitting.

-Chris
 
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Old 04-19-07, 10:48 AM
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Sorry for multiple postings: I just read that it's not proper to use flare fittings in concealed walls. This shower, though, has a neatly-designed access door behind it. In anyone's opinion, does that make the use of the flare fitting acceptable?

(I realize it's not a big deal to change it, but still, less plumbing work is always a good thing for me).

-Chris
 
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Old 04-19-07, 01:30 PM
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In my opinion flared fittings (properly made) are much more secure than are single-ferrule compression fittings. (There are two-piece ferrule compression fittings that I prefer but they are an industrial item and not readily available to the general public.) I still wouldn't "bury" a flared fitting in an inaccessible wall and NEVER bury a compression fitting in an inaccessible wall.

However, if you have an access door then your wall is not inaccessible and I would have no worry about having the flared fitting in that space. Just be sure to check on it for the first few days to be absolutely sure it isn't leaking.
 
 

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