sump pump outside discharge line q's


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Old 05-02-07, 12:49 PM
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sump pump outside discharge line q's

Hi all,

I am installing a sump pump + backup sump pump in my basement and am planning on running 1+1/2" PVC from the pumps up, through the joist, to the outside. From there I was going to put in an elbow to direct the PVC pipe to the ground and then bury the PVC pipe going away from the house, sloping down so as to avoid freezing during the winter (I'm in NY state), and then ending in a ditch running between my property and the neighbor's. My questions are:

1) Will the exposed PVC pipe running from the joist down to the ground be okay long-term? That side of the house doesn't get a lot of sun, if it makes any difference.

2) Is it okay to bury the PVC outside? It seems like the other outdoor, buried drain pipes I've seen are corrugated black plastic, but I'm not clear on what the advantages of that are over PVC.

3) If I need to utilize a corrugated black plastic discharge line, what size should I use, and how do I couple the 1+1/2" PVC to it?

4) Is it okay to leave the end of the discharge pipe open, or is there some kind of screen which is commonly capped on the end?

Thanks for your help!!!

Bill
 
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Old 05-03-07, 08:25 AM
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answers

Hi all,

Since no one on this board seems to know the answers to my q's, I dug up some answers myself. Here's what I found, for those of you in similar situations:

1) Will the exposed PVC pipe running from the joist down to the ground be okay long-term? That side of the house doesn't get a lot of sun, if it makes any difference.
> If the area does not have direct exposure to sunlight, it should be fine for at least a few years.

2) Is it okay to bury the PVC outside? It seems like the other outdoor, buried drain pipes I've seen are corrugated black plastic, but I'm not clear on what the advantages of that are over PVC.
> Corrugated black plastic pipe made of polyethylene is commonly used for drainage because it is relatively cheap, weathers temperature extremes and the elements well, and generally lasts forever. For those of you worrying about the corrugations catching water, type S pipes are corrugated on the outside but smooth on the inside, so water won't accumulate inside the pipe (assuming it's angled downwards).

3) If I need to utilize a corrugated black plastic discharge line, what size should I use, and how do I couple the 1+1/2" PVC to it?
> 4" corrugated back poly pipe seems to be the standard. To couple a 1+1/2" PVC pipe to 4" poly pipe, you buy a cap for the 4" poly pipe and then drill a 2" hole into it into which you can stick the PVC pipe and then seal around it.

4) Is it okay to leave the end of the discharge pipe open, or is there some kind of screen which is commonly capped on the end?
> Leaving it open should be fine, though if you're worried about critters, you can always attach a jury-rigged screen / chicken wire or use a "pop top" discharge cap.
 
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Old 05-03-07, 11:52 PM
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The only thing i would be concerned about is the 4" pipe size. Your pumps only push so far and require certain size piping. Of course you stated that the outside pipe is on a slight decline so in that case it should be ok i guess. Just make sure you put in some sort of clean-out before you tie the PVC in so if you have to you can snake out the 4" line.
 
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Old 05-04-07, 06:53 AM
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My only concern would be that the pipe coming out the wall and then down to another 90 may have water standing in it that could freeze. All it would take is a little dip in the pipe further downstream for a trap like feature to develop.

I'd drill an 1/8 hole in the elbow facing away from the house so air could be allowed in the line to break any vacuum at all in the line. Make it as high as possible, but remember, water will coming out this hole when the pump is on.

Just a thought.
 
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Old 05-07-07, 08:51 AM
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clean-outs and freezing elbows

Hey guys,

Thanks for the replies!

CSG: The pipe directly connected to the sump pumps is 1+1/2" PVC; it only transitions to 4" corrugated black poly after reaching the ground. I figured that, since the diameter is larger (4" vs. 1+1/2") it shouldn't increase pressure in the PVC. I'm curious, though, what this clean-out is that you mentioned. Do you have a link that shows what a clean-out part looks like and how it's attached?

notuboo: Is the 1/8" hole you're suggesting an "emergency valve" of sorts in case the PVC pipe going from the house down to the ground gets plugged with ice? How likely is it that water will get trapped in the elbow? I figured any water going through would just drip down at that point into the 4" poly rather than getting trapped and freezing at the elbow. Plus, an 1/8" hole doesn't seem like it would help prevent the sump pump from overheating if the downward facing PVC were plugged with ice. but that just a gut impression, given that I don't have any experience in these matters. What's your thoughts on that?

Best,
Bill
 
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Old 05-07-07, 09:30 AM
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2 things.

1) Check out this link http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/product.asp?catalog_name=USPlastic&category_name=21341&product_id=18371

That is a clean-out....the middle branch you face up and put a cap on so if you need to later..you open the cap and can stick a snake or hose or something into the line to get a clog out. I don't shop from that website. Was trying to get you a pic heh


2) The 'pressure' i was referring to was this....the pump on the sump-pump can push for example (figures not correct) water through an 1.5" pipe for 200'. If you increase that pip to 4" now you can only push water 100'. So my point was, my only concern was making sure the pump wasn't being overworked...but if the black corrugated pipe is running slightly downhill then that shouldn't be an issue and you can ignore my comment.
 
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Old 05-08-07, 05:39 AM
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aha!

Hey, CSG, thanks for the link - now I understand what you mean by a clean out, and I can see that it makes a lot of sense. That'll save me a good amount of trouble later on when the pipe needs to be declogged. Thanks for the great suggestion!

re: the pressure, it's not really an airtight seal by the time the water gets to the corrugated pipe ("corrugated pipe" meaning pipe that looks like this: http://drainage.plasticpipe.org/index.Service_Life.asp ), as the corrugated pipe only has soil-tight fittings. So the sump pump should only need to work to push the water through the 1+1/2" PVC, after which the water basically falls into the corrugated pipe and drains via gravity. At least, that's what I hope is going to happen... *

Thanks again for your kind help!!
 
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Old 05-08-07, 11:30 AM
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Sump pump

A sump pump should only pump to the point where it can reach a gravity flow, from that point there is no pressure as long as the drain line is sloped down stream. Have a good one.
 
 

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