Shower Valve Replacement


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Old 05-14-07, 02:52 PM
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Talking Shower Valve Replacement

I am going to replace the other shower valve assembly in my other bathroom. This is a shower only no tub. I want a high flow valve because i have a huge shower head and want plenty of water, does anyone have information on a good product to buy and where i could order it.. That area of the house is plummed with 3/4 " cpvc and I have 75 to 80 psi on the lines. Any help would be appriciated. thx gk
 
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Old 05-14-07, 03:37 PM
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All the valves you buy now, will have an anti scald feature which will limit abrupt changes in water temperature, and, by nature, they have a limiting affect on water pressure in order to achieve that.
Look for a brand that will allow for the individual adjustment of both temperature and pressure. Most higher end single CCW rotating, cold to hot units will have those adjustments. If you are using a rain head, heed the instructions and don't use cpvc as a riser pipe from the control valve to the head. I know Delta specifically states that you should use copper or iron for the riser to the rain head. No explanation, just do it.
Good luck with the installation, and pleas post back if we can help further.
 
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Old 05-14-07, 06:15 PM
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Thanks...Chandler for the info.. I installed a Moen and did use cpvc for the riser I could see that copper or pipe would be need for strenght for a large shower head. I have a Kohler for the other shower I bought at HD but the wife wants alot of water (one of lifes smaller pleasures) taking a shower. I have not ever sweated copper but think I will try. The Moen had directions it was all pictures...thanks again GK
 

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Old 05-15-07, 01:32 AM
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I'm a little late..but you can buy 1/2" supply valves and 3/4" supply valves. Obviously you'll get more volume out of the 3/4" ones. Course a lot of this is determined by the showerheads themselves as well. Chandler is correct about the water conservation devices put in these things. You could pull your shower head off...check the back of it and remove any little devices you see in it will should increase the water coming out of the showerhead.
 
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Old 05-15-07, 04:53 AM
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Allthough you may get the water volume to the shower head that you desire but correct me if I'm wrong but aren't shower heads today designed to only put out a max of like 2.6 gpm in order to save water ??
 
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Old 05-15-07, 03:13 PM
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yes...that I'm aware of but, can be modified.
 
 

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