May need to Retro fit an anti-siphon or backflow preventer


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Old 05-31-07, 09:23 AM
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May need to Retro fit an anti-siphon or backflow preventer

I had a home Sale Pre-inspection. the guy says I should have an anti-siphon valve installed on both the outside hose bib, and the Dishwasher.

The outside hose bib theory was that someone could leave the end of a hose in a bucket and it could siphon back intothe house.

I read here that there are backflow preventers, and anti-siphon valves.

Do they accomplish the same thing? Which is the easiest cure for this 'problem' ?

I'll need to check the dishwasher - it's fairly new - maybe it came with such a valve internally? ( would it? maybe? )

Thanks
 
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Old 05-31-07, 10:46 AM
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There are vacuum breakers that are typically used on outside hose faucets. Many new faucets have them built-in, they can also be purchased as a screw-on accessory. Watts is one manufacturer.

Dishwashers either use an air-gap device (sometimes a code req't) that comes through the countertop or a simple loop of the DW drain hose under the countertop to prevent sink/disposal drain water from entering the dishwasher. Obviously, the loop is the easiest and is accomplioshed by looping and hanging the DW drain hose up against the bottom of the countertop.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 11:04 AM
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Who was this "guy" with all the suggestions? Home inspectors are not well versed in code compliance and reputable ones don't pretend to be. A vacuum breaker on each hose bib is a good idea in any case, but the use of a dishwasher air gap or not is a code issue. It's required in some places and not in others. On the other hand, it's not expensive or difficult to install.

And no, your new dishwasher is not going to have one.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 12:14 PM
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"Home inspectors are not well versed in code compliance "

Amen to that. I don't know what qualifies someone as a home inspector, but I have been involved with 3 during home sales and NONE of them knew squat. Not just about code, but in a couple of cases they didn't know much about construction either. In my area most are ex real estate people. After failing at real estate sales they decided to become incompetent in another field.

One hired by my daughter for a new home purchase ended up being an ex employee of the builder. He wasn't even a trade pro, he was a real estate guy that at one time sold the builder's homes.

I think finding a good home inspector is like finding a reliable mechanic. you just never know what your'e going to get.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 12:21 PM
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This guy is 'fairly' knowledgeable

He was one of the building maintneance 'guys' for one of our buildings ( 6 story older retro to corporate office - I won't go into the complete collapse of Montana Power.... ) and also does the building maintenance at the local college.


He's only in the inspection business 2 years ( working toward a retirement pursuit), but also only 1 of 2 with a NACHI license in this burg.

Oh, and he showed up! even slightly earlier than the appointment!
( ya take what ya can get in this town. )
 
 

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