3/4 supply lines for Shower/Jets


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Old 06-05-07, 10:03 PM
K
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3/4 supply lines for Shower/Jets

I'm trying to re-do my bathroom and the idea of having Jets in the shower is very appealing. I have my bathroom walls down to the studs around the shower area. The hot and cold input lines are copper, 1/2 inch. I have heard that I need to get 3/4 inch lines to supply the jets and the shower at the same time otherwise there isn't enough pressure.


I know there is a 3/4 inch cold input line from the outside. I can probably patch into it from the bathroom floor. It looks like it's going right into the bathroom wall. There is also a hot water line from the water heater that is 3/4 inch going into the house.

This is a two story house built in 1975. Is it OK to patch directly into the input supply line for the cold and then route a splitter of some sort from the hotwater heater into bathroom? Or should I try to find the 3/4 inch loops for both hot/cold in the floor and then patch into it?

I've done some plumbing before (replacing faucets, installing new plumbing for showers, soldering copper pipes etc.. ). Not sure if this is going to be something I should tackle or get a professional to come out and do it.

Any suggestions, comments, sympathy?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 01:15 PM
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As a fellow DIYer....if it were me....

I'd trace the 1/2" lines from the current faucet valve back as far as I could until you find a 3/4" to tap into. I'd want to make sure what I tap into is sometime AFTER the entry to house, as a house built in 1975 MAY have pressure value and you wouldn't want to defeat that. The hot water, of course, HAS to come after entry and after the water heater.

Will you have access and clearance to be able to repalce all of the 1/2" with 3/4"?...holes drilled in floors, through joists, walls, etc? Can you fabricate the new sections of pipe and get them in place? You might run into a spot that requires an elbow that you won't be able to reach, so you might have to make the piece, and slip into place like a Tetris puzzle!

I'd look at it real carefully BEFORE you start! Once you cut the water and start cutting pipes, you're pretty well stuck until you're done. If there aren't any already in place, I'd add a couple of shut-offs first. Then you can at least turn the water back on to the rest of the house. It's really nice to be able to use the toilet even if you can't shower!

Might turn out to be more work than you thought.

But then again, isn't always?

Good luck,
Tom
 
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Old 06-06-07, 02:23 PM
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Back when I learned plumbing it was said 1/2" copper had the same flow volume as 3/4". galvanized. (Copper is much smoother inside.) So when you say 3/4" were they referring to 3/4" galvanized or copper?
 
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Old 06-06-07, 02:35 PM
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Ray,

I just assumed it was copper.

Logan, thanks for the advice. I will have to do the floor tiles as well. I have a feeling the 3/4" loop is going to under the floor. I will have the chance to look into it further after I tear up the floor tiles and pry up the sub floor.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 06-07-07, 12:34 PM
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Be aware that 3/4" pipe has about twice the inside area [and volume] of 1/2" pipe. This means that when you turn on the hot water in the shower, it will take twice as long for actual heated water to get there.
 
 

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