Gas Line Installation


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Old 06-27-07, 07:06 AM
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Gas Line Installation

Hello all,

I am new to this forum. I am installing an above ground pool and have a few questions about hooking up the pool heater to to gas line.

There are certain parts to this task that I want to do myself and certain parts that I would like for a plumber or HVAC guy to do.

I will run the code required 18" deep trench from the gas meter to the pool heater. This is about 160 feet. The manufacturer's suggestion is to used
1 1/4" diameter pipe, I wanted to use 1 1/2" to be extra safe. Is there a safty difference between 1 1/4" and 1 1/2" ? Why does the pipe diameter need to increase as the distance increases? I assume this relates to pressure somehow.

I also wanted to make all connections, such as: a coupler to increase the length of the pipe which only comes in 150 foot rolls. An adapter to go from yellow pipe to black pipe at the heater end and at the gas meter end. A shut off valve on both ends. All black pipe connections, except at the meter.

Basically I want to get everything ready and then have a professional hook the line up to the house on the house side of the gas meter (outside the house). Then I want to have him test the entire system with a manometer.

Just looking for input and also if anyone could suggest a reputable source in the Northwest Suburbs of Chicago.

Thanks,
Dan
 
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Old 06-27-07, 04:04 PM
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Welcome to the forum. There are many people here who can give you advice.

Please use the plumber / gasfitter as much as you can for your safety.

Gas works differently than fluids in pipes. Gas can be compressed, fluids have compression level so low, they are called incompressible. You need larger lines for further distances because of this along with a law of physics which I have forgotten.

The piping you mentioned may or may not be sold to you. If it is sold to you without you having the factory training card in hand, it is an illegal transaction. There are laws covering these types of gas products. You need the "atta-boy" card proving you have attended a class and can make proper connections. It's not brain surgery, but different brands have different fittings and different procedures. Just thought you should know this...

You will want a permit pulled for the work, not for more city income, but to spread the liability if anything is bad or goes bad. Your home owners insurance will also want to see the copy of the permit. They won't tell you this now, but , they will want a copy for their files.

Digging the trench and doing the grunt work will cut cost tremendously. It's a good idea. Don't forget the tracer wire.

The pressure check for the line varies with the local code, but it is somewhat standard and your plumber will have the equipment to perform this. The city inspector will also verify the pressure check at the same time.

Good luck with your pool heater and enjoy the cool summers in Chicagoland...
 
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Old 06-28-07, 02:10 PM
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Thanks notuboo. I did some checking and one plumbing supply place said that they could not sell it to me, then another place said that they could, so go figure. If I can actually get it, I will try and do all the grunt work myself and then have a gas fitter test everything and make the connections to the house and start the heater for me.

You mentioned the "tracer wire". I heard about that but am not totally sure what I should look for when purchasing it or how to incorporate it into the yellow pipe. Is it just a copper wire that is wrapped around the pipe? I'm assuming that it must be some special type of wire used for detecting leaks in the pipe.

Also, are there different grades or types of yellow pipe? What would be the safest? What should I ask for when I get the pipe?

Thanks again for your help. I appreciate it. Dan
 
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Old 06-28-07, 04:29 PM
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Before commenting too much I have one small question. What type of "yellow pipe" are you speaking of. There are many types of "yellow" colored gas line as yellow is the universal identifying color for gas. Each type has different applications and different methods to join the ends.

Just a few examples of the types of gas line are:

Copper tubing - requires flare fittings
CSST - requires special fittings from the manufacturer of the pipe
Polyethylene pipe - requires a chamfering tool specific for the brand of the fittings.

One last thing you may want to check with the gas company, if you didn't already, is that the gas meter/regulator will handle the extra BTU load of the pool heater.
 
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Old 06-29-07, 07:15 PM
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Hank.. Good call on the meter sizing. Hadn't given that much thought, but it is a consideration with the piping going in.
 
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Old 06-30-07, 12:03 AM
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from the Gastite installation manual:

CSST shall not be buried directly in the ground or directly embedded in concrete (e.g. slab on grade construction, patio
slabs, foundations and walkways). When it is necessary to bury or embed CSST, the tubing shall be routed inside a nonmetallic,
watertight conduit that has an inside diameter at least 1/2 inch larger than the O.D. of the tubing (Fig. 4-79).
For ends of the conduit installed outdoors, the conduit shall be sealed at any exposed end to prevent water from entering.
No mechanical joint fittings are permitted within the conduit.

I didn't think that stuff could go underground.
 
 

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