Working with gas pipe


  #1  
Old 07-06-07, 11:24 AM
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Working with gas pipe

The gas (natural gas) supply line coming up into my kitchen comes up a bit short. Basically, the line comes off of the meter in the basement in a straight run and passes under the kitchen. At that point, there's a T. The straight piece that comes out of the "bottom" of the T leads to an 90 degree elbow that sends it up through the floor. The straight piece that comes out of the T needs to be extended (replaced) so that the elbow is connected maybe 6 inches further down the line.

(There's actually a collection of pipes behind the stove (drain, water, heat) that come up through the floor as well that I'll be boxing in. I would like for the gas line to come up inside that box. Currently, it comes up a few inches in front of those pipes and consequently would come up in front of the box.)

This supply is for a new gas stove.

I don't really have a direction on this project so I am just going to supply a list of questions. Please forgive my incoherence.


If can't disconnect the pipes by unscrewing them, could I cut them out? If so, how would I reconnect the new piping?

Will I be threading these pipes? If not, how else do they connect?

What kinds of tools will I need?

I'm talking fundamentals here. I've never worked with this type of pipe before. Is it black pipe? galvanized? Could it be either? What is most common?

Can I use flexible tubing at the end of the pipe? (I assume the answer to this is yes.)

I greatly appreciate any and all comments and advice!

Thx!

EDIT: Incidentally, I am fairly handy and have done plenty of projects from sweating copper to electrical to masonry and am confident that I will be able to accomplish this task. It's just completely new to me so I need a place to start. Thx again.
 

Last edited by dinologic; 07-06-07 at 11:29 AM. Reason: Additional comment
  #2  
Old 07-06-07, 03:28 PM
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Before you do anything, turn the gas off at the meter. You want to unscrew these pipes, if you have any ambition in reusing any of them. Cutting them, would be a fast demo. Cut back to the tee on the main and start from there.

With the tee totally pipe free, awaiting your repipe to start. Install a short shouldered nipple and a shutoff valve. With this done, you can turn the gas meter back on and relight the furnace or water heater if needed. Be sure to soap test the new joints you made.

Run the new black iron pipe were you want it. Do not use galvanized pipe. Not a code accepted product in some jurisdictions, but is considered a bad practice in all jurisdictions.

If there are lengths of pipe that are longer than the nipples you buy off the shelf, you can have the pipe custom cut and threaded at virtually any big box store and most large hardware stores. Just take the lengths you needed with you and have them cut to order.

Your basic tools are pipe wrenches, you will need 2 of them.

Once you are back in the kitchen and ready to hook up the stove, put a shut off valve in place. Pressure check the line with a soap solution. You can use a flexible line as the appliance connector. Make sure it is rated for gas.

Have fun, take you time, I normally would not answer a gas question like this, but you asked the right questions and hit me in a moment of weakness.

More questions, ask away and someone will answer them for you.
 
  #3  
Old 07-06-07, 05:31 PM
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Excellent. Thanks so much notuboo. The fact that you said "have fun" is is quite pleasing to me. I love learning new things so this IS fun. And learning how to do things right is even more fun.

Thanks again!
 
  #4  
Old 07-07-07, 06:44 AM
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I always encourage homeowners to try to DIY if possible........but gas is STRICTLY A NO NO!!!have a licensed plumber do the job for you so it will be done correctly and to code ........your whole gas system should be tested after the installation to be SURE there are no leaks in the new OR old work...better safe than sorry....if you have a fire in your house do to a gas leak on the work you have done your insurance co. will NOT cover it.........!!!!!!
 
 

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