Outdoor Spigot Advice

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Old 07-28-07, 02:14 PM
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Outdoor Spigot Advice

I'm planning on installing a spigot outside, at a location about 20' from the house. My general plan is to dig down 12-18", run the pipe through the cinder block wall into the basement, then run it under the gravel driveway, to where it will poke out of the ground and be attached to a 4x4 cemented into the ground. Pretty simple, but of course, the devil is in the details. Some questions:

- What kind of pipe should I use outside? The flexible black plastic "sprinkler-type" pipe or PVC?

- I'll include a shutoff inside with a bleed screw to drain it in the winter. Do I need any kind of backflow preventer before it goes outside? Check valve?

- is 12-18" deep enough? I'm not worried about frost as I'll pitch it back towards the house and drain it in the winter. But what about under the gravel driveway?

- what kind of pipe should go through the cinder block? Should it be copper and then transition once outside and underground? Or should it transition in the house? Does the pipe need to be sleeved going through the concrete?

Thanks in advance for the help!

-Mike
 
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Old 07-28-07, 03:46 PM
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I would use PVC until it comes out of the ground, and then transition to either copper or galvanized, just for the protection a metal pipe will offer against things like lawn mowers and weed wackers. Use a garden spigot, you'll get more flow. A backflow device isn't required in this, except for commercial apps. You can of course add one if you want to.
 
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Old 07-28-07, 05:12 PM
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Further info. I would turn up into a freezeproof lift bail type spigot (see: http://www.biort.com/Frostproofyardhydrants.htm) that is buried to the depth of your pipe. The water doesn't stay in the vertical pipe but bleeds out after each use. Even if you bleed inside, you will still have the vertical column to deal with. We don't know where you live, so we can't comment on the depth of the pipe.
 
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Old 07-29-07, 06:22 AM
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Thanks for the quick responses. I updated my profile (I'm in New Jersey). I think the frost depth is about 30", but I'm not planning on digging that deep. I just plan on opening the faucet and draining the water out of the pipe.

Thanks again for the help!

-Mike
 
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Old 07-30-07, 05:22 AM
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I ran a 3/4" PEX line from my house to a fence on the side of my property, about 100' away. Transitioned from PEX to copper at the fence, then installed hose bibbs at the top of the copper.

Inside the house transitioned from PEX to copper and soldered in a couple valves to attach to the hose bibb feed that already existed (in essence I moved my original hose bibb and added 2 by the fence).

PEX was very easy to work with. Unrolling it is a little PITA, but it was pretty cheap (100' for 30 bux at HD). The only issue would be making the connections if you dont have access to the tools (they are expensive, so you cant easily justify buying them). I used SharkBite connectors, which are, themselves, expensive....but cheaper than the crimp tools for PEX. Because I didnt have that many connections it didnt cost too much. And the fact that they just snap onto the pipe saves a LOT of time and frustration (the pipe can also turn in the fitting, so if your angles are slightly off you can correct). They can also transition from different piping types, so you can have PEX coming in and copper going out. Very nice.

-chris
 
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Old 07-30-07, 09:35 AM
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Good to know. I didn't know that PEX was rated for direct burial. I could see how that could make a non-straight run much easier.

Thanks for the advice!

-Mike
 
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Old 07-30-07, 11:22 AM
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I actually have a roll of the black irrigation-type pipe. PEX actually seems to have a thicker wall, which could explain why its slightly expansion resistant (i.e. if you leave water in it and it freezes) compared to the irrigation type stuff.

I too was going to use the irrigation pipe, but before they poured it our concrete guy said PEX under concrete/asphalt will work better. The one caveat of PEX is that it cant be exposed to direct UV rays for an extended period (extended is listed as 30 days). I have no idea what happens to it.......I assume it breaks down, but Im not quite sure if it breaks down and might develop pinholes, or if it just pops right open. As such, Ive just buried all of my PEX as best I could. No where near the frost line, but I plan on blowing out the line every year anyway.

-Chris
 
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