New Refrigerator Water Line


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Old 08-15-07, 06:10 AM
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New Refrigerator Water Line

Hi,
I'm currently in the process of redoing my kitchen. I'm a bit stuck on how to hook up a new fridge that will be delivered in the next week or so. My old fridge didn't have an icemaker, so I'll have to run a new water line. I'm not yet decided on copper vs plastic. I haven't read any bad things about plastic yet, so I may just go with that to save some cash.

Where I'm getting stuck is the hookup to the sink (well, the cold water line under the sink). I don't want to go with a self-piercing saddle-t valve (from what I've read, they're terrible). So, I guess I want to go with a regular t-valve. How hard is it to install a regular t-valve? Any guides out there? What tools do I need?

Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 08-15-07, 06:46 AM
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Without seeing any pictures, I would think you would have to be bale to solder in a regular T-valve.

I've used the saddle valves and not had any problems whatsoever, both copper and plastic. I just think the plastic may be a little easier to fish through any openings that have bends you may need to go through. The copper tends to kink.

Good luck,
Tom
 
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Old 08-15-07, 11:08 AM
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What kind of saddle valves have you used? Self-penetrating or the ones that you have to drill yourself? I don't have experience w/ either, so I'm just going off of what I read online. Everything I've read thus far says they're absolutely terrible (except for what you're saying).
 
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Old 08-15-07, 11:25 AM
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The box stores have shut off valves that have an extra outlet that can be used for an icemaker water line. You would replace the existing cold water shutoff valve under a sink with the new one.
 
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Old 08-15-07, 06:49 PM
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all needle valves (self peircing saddle type valves and anything else with the same sort of valve on it) are 100% junk. they will leak, it's just a matter of time. you can buy a replacement anglestop that has both the regular 1/2" or 3/8" outlet for the kitchen sink and also a 1/4" outlet off the side that will let you hook up the icemaker line. is this line now, or in the future, going to be fed with a reverse osmosis water system? if yes, then you can not use copper. the r.o. water will disolve the copper and cause leaks. i'd use plastic if it were me.
 
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Old 08-16-07, 04:38 AM
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I went out last night to HD and picked up a new compression shutoff valve that has two 3/8th openings. One will be going to the sink, and the other will be going to the water line. The water line is 1/4 inch though. So I need some type of stepdown to go from the 3/8th -> 1/4. I'm not exactly sure what this will look like. I would think it'd be barbed on the 1/4inch side and smooth on the 3/8th inch side, or possibly threaded on the 3/8th inch side. The guy working the plumbing section at HD didn't seem to know. Any ideas what I need here? Should I return the valve and go somewhere else to find a new compression valve w/ a 3/8th AND a 1/4?

Also, while I'm asking questions, since it's a compression valve, I don't need to solder right? Do I need to apply sealant? What do I need to hook up to the end of the 1/4inch plastic waterline in order to connect to the valve (assuming the valve had a 1/4inch opening)? I think I read somewhere that I can't connect right to the plastic.
 
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Old 08-16-07, 07:51 PM
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you shouldn't need to solder anything. what you'll do is this. shut off the water to the house and release the pressure. get 2 crecent wrenches and loosen the compression fitting on the old anglestop. not take the nut off of the new anglestop and thread it onto the old one you just removed. if the threads are the same you're in good shape. not put a little thread sealant ( as a lubricant, not so much a sealant in this instance) on the male compression threads on the new anglestop. put it on the copper pipe and tighten it up with the old nut and ferrule. now turn the water on and check for leaks.

idealy, you'd relace the old nut and ferrule but they can be reused. you need a specialty puller to remove the old ferrule and nut so, unless you already have the tool or want to spend $30 on one, just reuse the old parts. if the threads of the old and new stops are not the same, you have to remove the old nut and ferrule or try and find a new stop that has the same threads.

to connect the plastic line to the anglestop all you'll need is a plastic ferrule to replace the brass one that is supplied with the anglestop and a metal insert for the plastic tubing. they sell compression reducing couplings that will go from 3/8" to 1/4". what i'd use is a stab-together fitting instead. one brand name is john guest and you should be able to find the fittings at some hardware stores. all you do is shove the platic tubing in and that's it.
 
 

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