Main Water line from street to house


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Old 10-19-07, 01:21 AM
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Main Water line from street to house

Hi everybody, first time here and thank god. I need a little advice here on running the main water line from the house to the street. I have been ordered by the utility company to have my own seperate water line after living here for over 20 years. I live in a double block home and just own my side and the water line comes through the other owners side. If they wanted to shut her water off(say for not paying her bill),my water would then be shut off also.

My main question is, can I run the copper pipe up the side of my house instead of running it directly through the front of the house. The reason being is I have a 4 foot wall in my front yard and the water line has to be 4 feet deep,making this an eight foot deep trench. Now if I was to go up the side of my property it would be only 4 ft. deep. Also can you put a 90 degree bend in type K copper line? I don't want to put no fittings on the pipe that will be outside underground.

I'm planning on getting a 60 foot roll of the Type K pipe. I'll have more then enough pipe,Was just curious if this pipe can be bent at 90 degrees with a pipe bender. Also I don't want to use a gate valve,can I use a ball valve for the main line where it enters the house?

Thanks

John
 
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Old 10-19-07, 03:32 AM
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Are they requiring you to use copper, or can you use pvc? It would be alot easier to work with, and yes, a brass ball valve is in order, not a pvc valve (they tend to lock up too easily). You will be running 1" line from the street to your house, and step it down to 3/4" after the PRV.
 
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Old 10-19-07, 06:42 AM
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Chandler thanks for replying, I really apperciate it. I know a guy that works for the water company and he told me to run 3/4 inch type K and it has to be copper. He said the only time you see plastic(it's orange) pipe being used is for gas lines.At least around here.

Do you know if that copper pipe can be bent 90 degrees?

I'm going to give the water company another phone call and see what they say, hopefully I might be able to use plastic instead,crossing my fingers on this one.

Thanks

John
 
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Old 10-19-07, 08:11 AM
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Let's hope you can use pvc, as copper will prohibitively expensive at this time (scrap is $3-4 per pound). PVC is fairly rigid, unlike the gas line you describe, and making 90 degree turns with the copper would be like making a u-turn with a tractor trailer.
 
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Old 10-19-07, 09:37 AM
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Smile Water line

ewolfe 315;

1: I would not use type k-copper unless you have no choice.
The plastic type lines are much cheaper and easier to work with.

2:Bending type k in a 90 deg. angle is almost impossible without an extreme arc.

3: You should be able to run your line anywhere you want to as long as your are on your property and you can make the proper depth.

4: Ball valve is the way to go, gate valves are passe.

Hope I'm helping, Luck.
 
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Old 10-19-07, 07:54 PM
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Thanks for the advice guys. I called the water company and as usual, no one was in to talk to me. There suppose to call me back within 2 days.

Now if they allow me to use plastic pipe. What kind do I get? I never worked with plastic pipe,except for sewage lines.

I've got at least 5 to 6 feet to work with on my property line,so thats no problem.

Hopefully they'll allow me to use plastic. I know a 60 foot roll of the Type K copper was going for in the mid $300's here and right now they have a 20 % off all there copper pipe. I'll keep you guys posted. Thanks again

John
 
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Old 10-19-07, 10:11 PM
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IF you can use plastic pipe and IF poly tubing is legal in your area i'd go with pex. for the same reason you didn't want to use any fittings, you can run 60' of 1" pex with no fittings so you have fewer possible points of failure. it's a little more expensive than pvc but you should be able to pick up enough pex for under 100 bucks. it's also better suited to freezing temperatures than pvc or copper.





paul
 
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Old 10-23-07, 04:17 PM
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Oh boy, The water company got back to me finally after I called them again. Can't use plastic, copper pipe only and to top it off I also have to add a back flow preventer also. The main man at the water company is suppose to call me back with the SPECS,lol. I have no clue on how they expect me to get this in. No elbows allowed outside,just a straight pipe with no types of connections.

Now what kind of back flow preventer do I use and how much do these cost?

Thanks
John
 
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Old 10-23-07, 08:24 PM
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Anybody with answers to the previous post???

John
 
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Old 10-24-07, 11:27 AM
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backflow preventers

ewolf, I am in charge of the state backflow program here in Kansas. There are several types of backflow preventers, depending on the potential hazard your utility is protecting the distribution system from. I would guess that the two types acceptable would be a double check valve assemble or a reduced pressure principle backflow preventer. Both cost in the hundreds of dollars and have to be professionally tested annually. It is the responsibility of your water supplier to tell you exactly what type of backflow preventer they require, and where to buy it at, since they aren't usually stocked at Wally World. There are also installation specifics, so you need to determine what your jurisdiction requires.

FWIW, here in Kansas, we don't require backflow preventers on residential dwellings, UNLESS they have an underground lawn irrigation system, and then we require the backflow preventer to be installed outdoors on the water line serving the lawn irrigation system only.
 
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Old 10-24-07, 03:05 PM
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Thanks Beachboy, I guess I'll have to wait to hear from the utility company as to which one to use. I know down at our local little league field,we had to get one installed this year and it looks like one of those double check valves.

Thanks a bunch what you said finally makes sense to me.

I was looking online and found a Watts 009M3QT and also a Wilkins Model 975XL. Another $200.00, lol, down the pipe.

John

Thanks again for the heads up,all I had to do was go order the wrong one. That would have made my day.

So I'm guessing everybody in the area must have these installed.
 
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Old 10-27-07, 12:51 AM
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When I had my second water meter installed for irrigation, water department wanted the backflow preventer on irrigation system (which is required anyway), back flow preventers on outside hose bibs (which squeal like pigs when water is running through them) and a dual check valve. Of course, they don't tell you this all at once.

Nobody had a good answer as to why the dual check is needed, but just that the state requires it.

The dual check I used is a Watts No 7 series dual check (this is also what the plumbing inspector told be to use). I got it from Graingers for $45 or so but was unable to find in on their online catalogue right now. Googling found this place and appears the 3/4" size is cheaper than what I got it from Graingers.
http://www.pexsupply.com/Categories....D=780&brandid=
 
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Old 10-29-07, 08:13 PM
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Ok guys here we go with the SPECS from the water company.

1.Type K copper 3/4 inch only. Straight line from curb to house.

2. 4 feet deep (frostline).

3. Once inside house,shutoff, pressure reducing valve, Back flow preventer, another pressure reducing valve and another shutoff.

4. Now this one gets me, I also need to install a drain,Why?

The problem I have now is with the drain, How do I install a drain when the basement is below ground level?? There's no way I can hook it into the sewer line as the main sewer line runs through the neighbors house..

In over 20 years living here,I only had to use a shop-vac 3 times in the basement due to torrential downpours.

Anybody with any thoughts or ideas on the basement drain. I mean the basement is not used for living quarters,just for tools and such.

Thanks

BTW, He told me the water pressure in my area is 100psi and I ordered a 150 psi backflow preventer that has dual handles, sorry but thats the best way I can describe it.
 
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Old 10-30-07, 04:21 AM
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Check to see if they mean a drain on the line, rather than what you are thinking, a drain in the floor. They may be referring to a device to drain the line pressure. Just to clarify things. If that is the case, you can install ball valves with integral bleed valves to suffice the "pipe drain" situation.
 
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Old 10-30-07, 06:11 AM
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Most likely the drain is for the back flow preventer. These operate by draining water and since this is inside, the water would need to be controlled. You can always use a condesate pump (of course does not work if you loose power) or pipe it to a sump pit (if you have one).


Got to love the codes. Why on earth do you need two PRVs
 
 

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