Cutting Stub Outs To Right Length


  #1  
Old 10-25-07, 08:36 AM
R
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Cutting Stub Outs To Right Length

Hello - hopefully this question isn't too silly.

I've just finished replacing some g. steel water lines with copper which have been stubbed out about 4" from the finished wall for a pedistal sink installation. (pressure tested and ready to go)

I am now at the point of cutting off the stubouts and installing ball valve fixtures.

My question is how do I cut these pipes so as there is no copper pipe exposed? I want the ball valve to butt right up to the pipe flange but when I tighten the compression nut on the ball valve, it will turn up toward the valve and expose the copper pipe underneath... right?

I hope this makes sense!

Thanks in advance to any advice I can get... and I'm having trouble getting on the net lately so if I don't respond right away, please know that I AM grateful for your input.

thanks much ~ R. DIY'r
 
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Old 10-25-07, 09:51 AM
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Re: "I want the ball valve to butt right up to the pipe flange but when I tighten the compression nut on the ball valve, it will turn up toward the valve and expose the copper pipe underneath... right?"

Right. Not much you can do about it, unless you can find an appropriate decorative sleeve to go around the pipe.

The minimum the pipe needs to extend out from the wall is:
the depth of the wall escutcheon +
the thickness of the end of the compression nut +
the width of the ferrule +
the insertion length into the compression fitting.

Have heard of people using a cast fitting inside the wall with female pipe threads that a chrome plated nipple can be screwed into extending out to the valve for decorative purposes.
 
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Old 10-26-07, 07:56 AM
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That gives me some ideas to work with.

Thanks Very Much!

~eric
 
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Old 10-31-07, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by formula
Re: "I want the ball valve to butt right up to the pipe flange but when I tighten the compression nut on the ball valve, it will turn up toward the valve and expose the copper pipe underneath... right?"

Right. Not much you can do about it, unless you can find an appropriate decorative sleeve to go around the pipe.

The minimum the pipe needs to extend out from the wall is:
the depth of the wall escutcheon +
the thickness of the end of the compression nut +
the width of the ferrule +
the insertion length into the compression fitting.

Have heard of people using a cast fitting inside the wall with female pipe threads that a chrome plated nipple can be screwed into extending out to the valve for decorative purposes.
Is it preferable to use the compression type fittings with the ferrule, or do some people use the solder on type with the threads? I pick up the threaded type, that would require me to solder them to the copper stubs, but now am thinking I should use the simpler version to ease the installation. Any suggestions? I don't want leaks, but I think the rest of my house has the compression type also.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 11:19 AM
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If you solder, make sure that you don't have PEX (plastic tubing) in the wall that is less than 18" from the joint you are soldering.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 03:26 PM
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One solution to covering exposed copper pipe is to use a chromed pipe nipple for the stub out. Solder a copper union inside the wall and thread the pipe nipple into that. Same concept as a shower and toilet.
 
 

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