Toilet pipe leaking


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Old 11-15-07, 04:47 PM
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Toilet pipe leaking

New problem. My hubby got the new tank on, but when he went to turn the water back on underneath, it started spraying water out at the pipe. No water filled the tank for the few seconds we had the faucet turned on. What in the world?! We've had it turned off for a little over a week. Did we do something wrong? What do we do from here - is a plumber our only solution?

We've got that house full of teenage boys coming over in 24 hours!

HELP! Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 05:40 PM
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You haven't really told us where the water is spraying. Is this something inside the tank, or in the water line connection under the tank? A picture of the area would help.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 06:11 PM
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Under the tank right where the pipe connects to the on/off valve on the wall.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 07:55 PM
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Aggies - I'm a little confused about where the leak is located because the pipe doesn't connect to the valve under the tank. Usually there is a short piece of pipe or tubing connected right under the tank and the other end is attached to the shut off valve on the wall or floor. Which end of the pipe is leaking?

If it is the one at the valve is the leak from the threads or from around the pipe? This is most often a compression fitting. Properly tightened it should not leak. Are you sure that the compression washer or ferrule is in place under the nut? If your pipe is actually copper tubing, there should be a ferrule in place. That is what seals the connection. Is the nut properly threaded on the valve and not cross threaded or not completely screwed on?
 
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Old 11-16-07, 04:23 AM
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Replace the connecting hose from the toilet to the shut off valve with a flexible braided stainless steel. It doesn't require alot of torquing to seat it and leaks are usually not a problem. I have a feeling you are trying to reuse the original, which usually has problems built in.
 
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Old 11-16-07, 06:16 AM
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I'm a layman...is that a problem?

Thanks, Larry. So, are you saying this is something a complete newbie/layman can do? As long as the valve is shut off, it shouldn't leak, right?

Yes, it is the original hose. In fact, my hubby said it was pretty stiff and had a rusty coating on it when he went to reconnect it to the new tank. I just went and wiggled it around and got to wondering how to remove the old one. Does it twist off or do we have to cut it off?

I hope we can do it! It would be nice to not have to scramble to find a plumber today!
 
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Old 11-16-07, 06:35 AM
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Still learning some things.

Originally Posted by cwbuff View Post
Which end of the pipe is leaking? The end that butts up right against the shutoff valve, which is located on the wall under the tank.

If it is the one at the valve is the leak from the threads or from around the pipe? It's leaking from the threads and not anything on the actual shutoff valve or piping that extends into the wall. I hope I'm explaining that well. Unfortunately, I don't have a picture to post.

This is most often a compression fitting. Properly tightened it should not leak. Are you sure that the compression washer or ferrule is in place under the nut? Oh man, I wish I knew more about this stuff. I actually don't know what either of those things are. I will try to go online and google a picture. All I know is that my hubby said it was kind of stiff and had a coating of brown stuff (rust?) on it when he went to connect it back to the tank. If your pipe is actually copper tubing, there should be a ferrule in place. That is what seals the connection. Is the nut properly threaded on the valve and not cross threaded or not completely screwed on?
We were guessing that, since the hose is so stiff, that it must need to be replaced (unless it's normally somewhat stiff?). The home was built in '98. Is that hose something that usually needs replacing or do we need to figure out how to tighten some parts?

I'll try to figure out what the ferrule is. Please keep the advice coming! It's 8:30 and our church program starts at 5 tonight. We really appreciate your help.
 
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Old 11-16-07, 06:58 AM
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Okay, just squeezed down in there and saw there is a hole about the size of a pinhead in the hose just about a 1/2 inch above where the hose connects to the valve. HTH.
 
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Old 11-16-07, 01:04 PM
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Fixed!

Thank you, everyone! Our shutoff valve was welded to the copper pipe, so we had to cut off the valve and replace it. Hopefully, this works for a LONG time! Thanks to everyone for caring.
 
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Old 11-16-07, 04:07 PM
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One further question....why did you cut off the valve if the hole was in the pipe above it and leading to the toilet? All you had to do was replace the hose. But, if it works now, it should work for at least a couple of more days...no, good work, and congratulations on the DIY.
 
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Old 11-16-07, 05:08 PM
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Hi Larry,

Thanks for the nice words. We had to cut off the shutoff valve (no fun, believe me) because the hose running from the tank to the valve was welded to the valve. I don't know if that's something that's no longer done, but the hose was leaking, it was welded to the valve and, thus, the valve had to go too.

It was crazy how this all played out. First it started with a crack in one of the valves in the tank, we got that switched, then the fill valve (flush valve? - I get them confused) - the white pipe got knocked and broke off, then when we went to replace that, the tank crumbled as my hubby got the last rusted bolt off and then the hose ended up leaking as it was so rusted over and I'm sure that small movement from replacing the tank did it in.

So, it's been a week of learning! Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 11-18-07, 06:25 AM
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Aggie - that's called job growth. It's all part of a DIYer's life. one little "honey do' turns into a major overhaul as one thing after another pops up.

Case in point, my yesterday went like this.... Wife buys new tub faucet to match her new master bath decor. I get to install it - a 1 hour job.
Of course the new faucet interferes with existing supply piping - no problem I'll just move the piping. That requires cutting some pipes and moving the stop valves. I shut the isolation valves in the basement and cut the pipes. Drip, drip, drip as both isolation valves are leaking by. Tough to solder a dripping pipe. I broke my 20 year old tubing cutter while cutting pipe! Tried to sweat on the new fittings and stop valves but my 15 y/o torch kept going out. Tried a new bottle, same result. I started the 1-2 hour job at 9 AM and finished at 6 PM.

At least I got a new tubing cutter and a MAPP torch out of the deal.
 
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Old 11-18-07, 12:49 PM
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Tools, that's the trade off! Maybe your next project will entail heavy woodwork, requiring another specialty tool!
 
 

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