Is This Copper to Galvanized Connection OK?


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Old 12-02-07, 09:03 PM
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Is This Copper to Galvanized Connection OK?

I know that copper is typically connected to galvanized using a dielectric union. But is that the only way?

The reason I ask I that I had some recent plumbing work done - take a look at the copper pipe on the right hand size of the linked photo. Is it connected properly to the galvanized tee?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/10534438@N06/2082367987/
 
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Old 12-03-07, 04:22 AM
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No, you need a fitting with a dielectric break, not just a plain fitting, which is what I see here. Those joints will corrode quickly.
 
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Old 12-03-07, 09:44 AM
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Copper conection

biking_brian: Looks to me like a copper line connected to a brass elbow connected to galv. and then another brass elbow. You shouldn't have a prob. with that. What I would worry about is that galv. mess you have, that needs to be replaced.
 
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Old 12-03-07, 02:23 PM
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The plumber stopped by and took a look (I couldn't be there when he stopped by) and said there were brass fittings between the copper and galvanized, even if I couldn't see them.

Taking a closer look at the picture, is it possible that there is a brass nipple between the galvanized tee and what looks like to be a copper compression nut? I really need to wipe off the white gunk to check.
 
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Old 12-03-07, 03:20 PM
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Someone with more metalurgy knowledge will correct me if i am wrong, but brass/galv, is almost as bad as copper/galv, both with have galvanic action without a break between the two metals.
 
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Old 12-03-07, 10:11 PM
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it looks like there may be a nipple between the tee and the copper fip. when dissimilar metals cause corrosion it's the copper that deteriorates and leaks. if glav. and brass are together i think the damage is much less due to the time it takes for either to corrode. copper is so thin that, if touching steel, it'll corrode and leak much quicker.

a dielectric union would be the best option but if you have to use a nipple i'd use a much longer one, 6" or so. for the price of a 6" brass nipple you could probably buy 4 or 5 dielectric unions. not to mention it makes the work easier to do. the only reason i could see not using a union is if code prohibits it (not in an accessable location) or if the plumber didn't have one on his truck.






paul
 
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Old 12-04-07, 07:25 AM
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Inside the galv pipes

I know you probably will not like this suggestion but I would recommend to replace all the old pipes. I redid mine in May with Pex. I would also out in a water filter at the entrance of the water main.

The picture below shows the inside of the galv. pipes that I removed.

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...ingpics003.jpg

BOB
 
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Old 12-04-07, 08:54 AM
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Wow, the inside of that galvanized looks really bad! How old is that pipe? The plumber here says he usually talks people out of copper repipes because the galvanized holds up well with the water quality around here. The ones i my photo are about 50 years old - they look worse on the outside, as they just have a thin layer of gunk on the inside.
 
 

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