Compression Sleeve Removal

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Old 01-11-08, 11:06 AM
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Smile Compression Sleeve Removal

I am installing beadboard on the bottom half of the walls in the powder room in my house. It has a pedestal sink so the holes in the beadboard nee to be cut close around the plumbing pipes. When I tried removing the shut off valves from the copper tubing, the compression sleeves appeared to be frozen on. I didn't put a lot of effort into trying to get them off because the tubing is cut pretty close to the wall and I didn't want to risk damage. I worked in the residential const. ind. for about 20 years and consider myself pretty handy at most things, however, PLUMBING is my downfall. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 11:54 AM
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There is a tool for removing the compression sleeve - I believe a company called Pasco makes one.... in the absence of that particular tool - you can use a fine toothed hacksaw blade to carefully cut the sleeve away from the pipe - being careful not to cut into the pipe itself.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 12:40 PM
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My experience with brass compression sleeves on copper tubing is that you can not remove them and reuse the pipe.

If you do you are more than likely to have leak problems.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 03:06 PM
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To actually pull off such a job as ferrule removal I'd imagine would be very very risky and take the skill of a surgeon. Ferrules basically are 'crush-sleeves' that actually crush into the copper pipe forming an indentation in the copper tubing all the way around. Not ever meant for removal. If the valve ever fails, you simply unscrew the valve from the compression nut/ferruel end and buy a new one and reuse the nut/ferrule that is still on the pipe.

Thezster has picked my curiosity though about what kind of tool could extract that ferrule with no damage, dents or cuts into the tubing underneath it. I'll have to run this one by my master plumber/store owner I get stuff from all the time.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 03:22 PM
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PASCO makes a couple of tools for removing the ferrule and nut at the same time.

One tool isn't worth a da** and the other one will break the nut occasionally leaving the ferrule in place or partially off, depending on where it was.

Pipe damage does occur at times. Pipe not reusable for above stated reason by ecman51 more often.

I have these tools, I use them very seldom. It's easier to cut the parts off, when needed, at times; using a dremel tool.

JDM1450, good luck with your project. If you need any advice, just ask and someone will answer you. You'll even have different opinions to use for your decision.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by notuboo View Post
One tool isn't worth a da** and the other one will break the nut occasionally leaving the ferrule in place or partially off, depending on where it was.
If THAT happened that really would be the grizzled you-know-whats, as how then would you get a new nut to be under and past the ferrule that is still left on the pipe? What is extra problematic about this whole thing is often in this type of joinery, the compression nut is right against the wall of floor (perhaps sitting directly on a trim ring) making it pretty problematic to have to then try to fix the situation. That is why I would be so afraid.
 
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Old 01-12-08, 08:24 AM
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From experience - removing the sleeve and not damaging the underlying pipe is difficult - but not impossible.... (Most of the time)... by the way 0 the dremel idea is a good one - but requires a very, very steady hand....
 
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Old 01-12-08, 06:24 PM
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Compression sleeve pullers are available readily . The hardware store has one for about $10, and a better professional tool will run about $35. In my experience, the ring will always come off. If the nut was tightened to "normal" torque when first installed, you will be OK. If the nut was originally overtorqued a lot, then there will be a belly on the copper pipe which will make it difficult to get a good seal on a new one. This is why we often leave the nut and ring in place, if the threads on the new valve match the old one.

The fall back solution is to solder a male adapter on the copper and use an IPS valve.
 
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Old 01-16-08, 09:13 AM
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I'm pretty sure I've decided not to try and remove the compression rings. The main reason being that the pipes are cut off too close to the wall. If I had to cut the pipes back past any damage, I would be getting into the wall and need to extend the pipes back out. I really did not want to have to use the split covers but, I think for me it's the smarter decision. I also have 15 month old twins running around and requiring alot of dads attention, so any time I get for home projects anymore has to be spent wisely.
Thanks for everyone's time and advise. I look forward to spending more time here with you guys.
 
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Old 01-16-08, 09:28 AM
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15 month old twins?? Congrats - and I feel your pain LOL... Hope your decision works well - and keep in mind - there is more than one way to skin a cat - and all of them are correct if they work!!! (why would anyone want to skin a cat in the first place???))
 
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