Is This A Normal Practice for a Plumbing Pro ?


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Old 01-28-08, 02:57 PM
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Is This A Normal Practice for a Plumbing Pro ?

I have a 3/4 inch copper water supply line which comes into my crawlspace from the street. It curves smoothly into the vertical position as it comes out of the ground and travels up to floor joist level (about 30 inches), then makes a 90 degree elbow turn and branches to rest of system.

I asked a local plumber to install a ball valve shutoff on the line in the vertical section between ground and floor joists, and after a failed attempt to get a good solder joint (apparently due to residual water), he switched to a compression fitting ball valve. I've seen no leaks now for about a week...and the pipe is in a relatively rigid position (fixed at the buried end and attached to floor joists after it makes the 90 degree turn from vertical to horizontal).

Should I be concerned that this type of joint is significantly less reliable than a soldered connection in this situation....or is this a pretty standard solution to this type of problem?

Thanks....
 
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Old 01-28-08, 03:15 PM
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You should have no problem with the compression fittings. If so, you would have seen leaks shortly after the install. Are you on a well or municipal water? Where is your Pressure Regulating Valve located?
 
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Old 01-28-08, 04:04 PM
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What Chandler said. Attempting to solder with even the slightest drip of water is nearly impossible. As suggested above, a compression fitting should work fine if it is after any pressure regulator.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 06:25 PM
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Location of Pressure Regulator Valve ?

Chandler/Just Bill....

Thanks for the feedback...unfortunately I did not realize that there was not a pressure regulator in the system until after this work was done. I'm planning to have one installed, but I'm not sure whether it will fit in front (streetside) of the new shutoff valve in the crawlspace.

I'm on City water....I measured pressure on an inside laundry room faucet and got an average of 85 psi...and an overnight peak of 100psi....s

The PRV locations options appear to be either after the new cutoff in the crawlspace to protect the rest of the system...or I would need to have it installed somewhere in the yard between the house and the street supply valve....

I was told that putting the PRV in the crawl space has the advantage of keeping the PRV dry and more easily accessible... the yard is more involved.

Another possible option would be to try and fit the PRV between the new cutoff and the ground ...but it's pretty tight...particularly given that the water main starts to curve as it approaches the ground....maybe 8-10 inches of space between the new cutoff and the start of the curve...

The worst case would be to remove the new cutoff...use the vacant space for PRV, and install another cutoff after it (basically move the recently installed cutoff to a location after the PRV)....

Seems a shame to redo the current work...but I'd really like to make the solution as reliable and maintenance friendly as possible.

Any new thoughts?
 
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Old 01-29-08, 03:52 AM
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60psi is about normal for residential plumbing, 85 might cause some problems with marginal seal/connections, 100 not good.
 
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Old 01-29-08, 06:25 AM
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Since you are paying for the work to be done,I wouldn't think the cost would be much more to cut out what you have, install the PRV and then reinstall or install a new cut off just past the PVR. Don't worry about keeping the cut off in the exact place it is now.

At 85 psi + your plumbing could spring a leak at any time!
 
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Old 01-29-08, 06:45 AM
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The cost of moving/exchanging the ball valve in conjunction with installing a PRV should be trivial. I probably wouldn't worry too much about the compression fitting, most of the ones I've checked are rated at 200-300 PSI. If your worried find out what brand and type the plumber installed and check the specs.
 
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Old 01-29-08, 07:12 AM
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Thanks Guys....

Thanks for the advice....the power of these forums is really amazing....for both the brave DIYer....and those who just want to understand the technology and the options a little more clearly...!!!
 
 

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