Tub Drain Replacement?


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Old 02-13-08, 01:58 PM
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Tub Drain Replacement?

Hi. I have an old (1930s ?) tub on the second floor whose drain and overflow pipe have leaked in the past. Well, it doesnt seem to have leaked in a while, but it maybe just because showers have replaced baths lately. I am remodeling, so I now have the first floor ceiling completely out and have full access to all of the tub piping. It uses an old canister trap, but it doesnt appear to have leaked there. In any case, Im thinking that I should replace the overflow, drain and canister trap. If it makes a difference, there is a sink that also shares the drain line just after the canister trap.

Could I just hook this assembly to a new p-trap and then just tap into the existing drain line? I'm concerned about the function of the existing canister trap. Does it stop water from reversing flow? I mean, if I put a p-trap in, could the sink somehow send water past this new p-trap and into the tub instead of down the drain line?...since the p-trap exit is at the same level as the drain?

And, is the $17, 1 PVC overflow/drain kit at Home Depot good enough? There were brass versions (~ $26), but I failed to see the advantage.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 03:56 PM
J
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If you have the floor up, replace all pipe that you can see. Code for a tub/shower is 2", but replacing what is there with the largest that will fit in your space is good enough(no smaller than 1 1/2). Don't leave the old galvanized pipe there. A simple 'P' trap is much easier to service that those old traps. I prefer heavy gauge brass for tub drains, not usually what is at big box, but I am old school, PVC is OK. Surpised you did not mention lead pipe, often a normal in old plumbing.
 
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Old 02-15-08, 07:43 AM
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Thanks for the info, Just Bill. I have a plumbing supply place nearby, so I will take a look at their 2" tub drains. I will also try to replace as much of the galvanized drain as possible. It goes into a 4" cast iron stack, so I may just cut it off a foot away and use a Fernco to tie in the pvc drain...thus avoiding the scary lead and cast iron joint. ha. Didn't see any lead piping, just the normal lead packing at the cast joints. Thanks, again.
 
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Old 02-15-08, 09:19 AM
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Not trying to stir up a can of worms here - but I was under the impression that 2" was required for a shower - but 1.5inch was code for a tub/shower combo.....
 
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Old 02-18-08, 12:36 PM
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Thanks, thezster. That code thing is always entertaining for us. LOL This house is so old that new code is often well beyond what actually has been there **and working** for over 50 years. As for this particular pipe assembly, the effectual diameter would probably be 1/4", since it takes about 10 minutes to drain the tub. So, I will try to follow code, but any new pipe will be a huge improvement... and it will probably work fine for another 50 years. Thanks, folks!
 
 

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