copper pipe install

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Old 03-12-08, 06:32 PM
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Question copper pipe install

what's the best way to support copper 1/2" & 3/4" through the wall, as well as fastened up against a flat wall to minimize noise.
 
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Old 03-12-08, 06:46 PM
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Plastic single nail pipe clamps work fine. Support it on either side of the entrance/exit of the wall. Don't use galvanized clamps unless you line them with something as the galvanization may react to the copper.
 
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Old 03-12-08, 08:13 PM
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won't the back side which would be up against a flat surface cause the back side of the pipe to grown, mack noise, especially with say hot water, or a zoned boiler loop?
 
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Old 03-13-08, 05:35 AM
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I use copper pipe clamps, which hold the pipe snugly against the surface being used... and I use them liberally - never had a hammer issue - ever!
 
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Old 03-13-08, 05:39 AM
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Like Zster said, if you secure the pipes at every joist, they won't hammer. The hammering you encounter will be from runs in free air that aren't supported, and can be eliminated by a water hammer device installed, say , at your washing machine controls. I'd wait to see if I needed one before I installed it, however.
 
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Old 03-13-08, 10:28 AM
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If you're worried about hammering at that location, it's very, very easy to make your own hammer device. Run a vertical pipe with cap off the shut off valve. The idea is to have an air space in your water lines to absorb the pressure caused at shut off. Theoretically, it will hold air and minimize the hammer effect... Lot cheaper than buying $15 "devices"........ which are basically the same thing.
 
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Old 03-15-08, 08:18 AM
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Not really worried about hammer, more so growning and creeking, like in a hot water boiler system where the install might go through a 2x6 and there is just no room for expansion. I hear something similar at my parents house, in one of their bathrooms when you run the hot water to the sink, you hear a clank every few minutes.
 
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Old 03-15-08, 03:41 PM
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All hot water piping needs to be insulated. Use a split soup can over the insulation and then hangers to the joists for piping running under a floor.

The cold water pipes can also be insulated and this makes sense when run through unconditioned spaces to reduce sweating. If insulated use the same method as for the hot pipes for hanging. If you don't want to insulate the entire run of cold piping then just insulate and use the cans/hangers where hanging.

If running through drilled holes in studs or joists then be sure the holes are quite a bit larger than the pipe outside diameter. Ideally, line the holes with the slip-on insulation.

Do NOT try to make the installation rigid without any room for expansion as that will surely cause creaks and groans. If you must fasten one end solidly (like a terminal end using a drop-ear elbow) then be sure the other end may expand and contract easily.
 
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