Sanitary line replacement?


  #1  
Old 03-19-08, 05:42 AM
Z
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Sanitary line replacement?

I have a major plumbing issue and before I call a plumber, I want to get some information so I donít get screwed. I live in a community where they only license a handful of plumbers to work (ie, nepotism and cronyism) so you can only call a couple and you get the same story from everyone.

Anyway, my cast iron stack is rotten at the basement floor and making matters worse, when I bought the house in 2001, a sump pump was installed about 2 feet from the stack, which destroyed the floor and Iím certain has caused the sewer line under the floor to shift and break or separate. How do I know this? Because in a power outage when my sump pump goes off, water reaches a high point but never overflows, meaning itís surcharges into the sanitary line. But now I know thatís that fact because my sanitary is clogged and surcharging into the sump pit!

I plan to get it cleaned but I have a feeling that the problem is more likely that the line under the floor is collapsed or otherwise shot.

My question is, can I abandon the line in place and hang a new line on the wall and save ripping up my basement floor? My stack comes down around the mid-point of my house (front to back) about 3 feet from the foundation. I was thinking that I could tie in with PVC and carry the line along the foundation wall about 22 feet to the front of the house and then bust the floor up, drop it through there and replace it from the foundation to the street.

The cost in labor and materials, plus the destruction of a partially finished basement could be reduced using this method.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 03:56 AM
J
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You make a lot of assumptions that are not necessarily correct. I would have a video survey of the sewer line done. That will tell you exactly what the conditions are. Cast iron is usually good for at least 100 yrs, so unless your house is quite old, you may not have the problems you imagine.

For a good plumber, get references from friends, neighbors, relatives, coworkers, etc.
 
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Old 03-20-08, 08:56 AM
Z
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That's exactly why I come to these forums, to ask questions and get told I've made assumptions and not have my question answered.

Hate to break it to you, I work in civil engineering at a company that designs sanitary sewer systems for major land development projects, often miles and miles od sanitary in one job. As part of these projects, we run video inspections after construction to ensure the system was properly installed. So I am well aware of how to inspect a system and troubleshoot.

I didn't ask for your opinion on the lifespan of cast iron. YOU'VE made assumptions about the lifespan of cast iron based on ideal conditions or expectations, but FAILED to to account for soil, groundwater and other site specific conditions that may be in play at my particular location.

And most importantly, you failed to answer the question at hand.

Every single time I come to these boards, I get someone who feels like it's their role to make it SEEM like everything is more complicated than it actually is and that the average person asking the question is a complete idiot.

I simply asked whether hanging the sanitary line along a basement wall was something typical or possible as a repair in instances where removing and replacing the old line in the floor presented obstacles.

And lastly, you're assumption that the cast iron is in fact fine spits in the face of the issue at hand: waste water surcharging out the line and into an adajcent sump pit. The rate and volume of the surcharge, especially after letting a full tub drain is significant, meaning the hole in the line is certainly significant.

So thanks for ASSUMING I'm a moron, when in fact, I thought enough about the issue to realize that I liklely would WANT AND NEED to replace the line and was wondering about options.

Go back to trying to fool everyone into believing your a genius about plumbing and how hard it is, leave the engineering and brains to us.
 
  #4  
Old 03-20-08, 10:21 AM
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I don't want to speak for Just Bill, but I think he was just trying to help based on the information contained in the OP. I'm sure he wasn't aware of your qualifications. I saw nothing in his post that would warrant your response.

I am curious where you live. Contractors in my area are licensed by the state. The town has no say or control over what contractor I choose to use.
 
  #5  
Old 03-20-08, 02:05 PM
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Zonabb, if you are such an "expert" on civil engineering and sanitary sewer construction then why are you asking questions on a DIY board?

From your stated "expertise" one would think that you would KNOW the answer to your questions.

And if you don't know, then why don't you ask one of your co-workers, or maybe one of the construction companies that your firm deals with on these issues?

NOBODY on this DIY board gets paid a cent for trying to help people. Your attitude is where the problem lies.

As for people ASSuming that you are a moron...they might not make such an assumption if you used correct spelling and punctuation in your posts. The term you probably want to use is SURGING, not surcharging.
 
  #6  
Old 03-20-08, 03:56 PM
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I see Mr Zonabb left no contact info. I was going to contact him offline, out of courtesy, and ask why someone with so much knowledge is posting a question here, that is seemingly so simple to him. But it would seem it was to embarrass one of us. As sugested above, we do this to help people with less knowledge than he seems to have about the mysterious things under the floor.

Our 'suggestions' are nothing more than that. We have no first hand insight on any particular problem, so we have to guess at what the poster is telling us, and hope we can help.
 
  #7  
Old 03-20-08, 07:50 PM
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Furd said it very well. Mr. zonabb, you seem to know all the answers; and perhaps you should call a plumber for help.
 
 

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