vent pipe in kitchen

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Old 04-03-08, 05:38 AM
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vent pipe in kitchen

My house is 100 years old, and the kitchen is small. We are looking into redoing the kitchen, but there is a stupid pipe, maybe cast iron (?) in the corner of the only workable L that will fit with cabinets. If we frame around it it will take out a good chunk of already small counter and cabinet space. My understanding is that it is a vent off the sewage drain. One person asked if the kitchen sink is the only thing being vented here. How do I tell? There is a stretch of PVC up the other side of the house into which one of the bathrooms drains, but the PVC goes up to the roof, so that's a vent, right? Could that be venting enough for this pipe to be removed? How can I know by looking at the drain pipe setup?
 
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Old 04-03-08, 06:53 AM
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Studor Valve Maybe

You kitchen probably requires it own vent, but you perhaps can eliminate the cast iron that goes thru the roof and replace with a Studor Valve. Google it if you are not familiar.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 08:08 AM
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Does the cast pipe go up - or down? (I'm assuming up from your question). Your kitchen sink will require venting - and a studor vent is not allowed in some regions (check with your permit office when you submit your remodel plans, which will require plumbing alterations, hence a permit is required). I know it's not what you want to hear, but without venting, you run the risk of your sink not operating properly. Since you're into a serious remodel, it wouldn't be out of the question to try to re-route that pipe into the walls (entailing tearing out at least a portion of your current walls in the kitchen) - thereby allowing you that precious space you need.

I would suggest you pick up a DIY book on plumbing at your local box store - they offer the rationale, as well as the rules - for running proper plumbing - and sometimes you'll find tips that will make your job easier.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 10:18 AM
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Thanks for the input!

I'd like to thank you both for the replies. Does the pipe go up or down? It seems to do both. It looks like it goes down into the floor and into the main drain for the house, but at the top it changes to PVC and is routed into an old chimney to carry away the stink. Here's another catch. Both of the walls in that corner are outside walls, brick covered with lathe and plaster. If we do have to keep this pipe for venting purposes, can we punch through the outside wall and run the pipe up the outside of the house? If it's possible, and legal, it would be great to do this down low so it doesn't show above the countertop. Thanks again for helping!
 
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Old 04-03-08, 11:04 AM
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Your vent pipe can run outside the house, if you're not concerned about how it looks from the outside.

I'm still trying to visualize your issue... sounds like a vertical pipe, in a corner (almost) of the kitchen that takes up more space than you want it to. Someone, at some point in time, changed it to PVC at the top of the wall and vented it through an old, unused chimney (unusual, but not unheard of). You want your new venting pipes to connect to the PVC, if possible, while allowing your new cabinets to fit into the corner (am I interpreting correctly?). Is this pipe currently tied into the existing kitchen plumbing (drainage?) - or is it simply a vent for some basement/lower floor fixtures (basement washer/dryer for example)?

Need info - need info.... :-)

Without more info - I would consider (assuming it's both drain and vent for the kitchen) - running my new plumbing into the existing down portion for my drainage - and with a "T" at that point, making the upwards portion my legal vent - and cutting some holes in my new cabinets to allow the pipe to run through the rear of the cabinets... (cut the holes, hang the cabinets, glue the piping.. and box in the portion of pipe visible under the cabinets/over the countertop) FWIW without more info....
 
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Old 04-03-08, 11:36 AM
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This pipe goes straight up from the kitchen floor about 7 feet where it has been topped with a pvc bend and enters the unused chimney.

At about maybe 14 inches up off of the floor, the drain from the kitchen sink enters a T-fitting into this cast iron pipe.

Below that T-fitting where the kitchen sink drain pipe enters is a Y. One branch of that Y forms the "trunk" of this cast iron pipe. The other branch of that Y angles towards the back of the kitchen and is capped immediately.

The cast iron pipe goes straight down into the floor and then angles down and over to meet the main drain pipe for the house in the basement.

It doesn't seem like anything else is draining into this particular pipe before it meets the main drain in the basement. All of the pipes seem to meet up with the main drain in about the same area and all of them enter the main drain pipe above ground, whereas this one apparently enters the main drain somewhere under the foundation. The other pipes that enter are all PVC pipe. This is the only cast iron pipe besides the main drain.

If you need any more info just ask. Thanks.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 12:03 PM
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Gotcha!! Sounds like a drain/vent system for your kitchen.... That's the good part! You should be able to tap your sink drain right into it... Now - I don't understand why you can't bend it at the existing T so the vent portion is hidden behind the walls..... You have a brick exterior - framed with 2X4's - covered with lath/plaster... right? Remove the lath/plaster in the suspect area - move the pipe above the "T" into the void - and re-cover with drywall... (I know I'm missing something - but since I'm not there???) Can you post a photo somewhere? Would be a big help!!
 
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Old 04-03-08, 12:28 PM
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It's such an old house, I'm afraid the plaster is directly on the brick with no room for a pipe or vent behind it.

As far as punching directly through to the outside, we live in a historic district with many rules so I don't think they will allow that. Maybe, but probably not.

How many vents does there need to be in a house? We have three baths, a kitchen and a laundry. We for sure have the vent we have been discussing. We also for sure have a pvc vent pipe in one of the baths. All of the pipes in the house connect to one drain pipe in the basement. Does this make any difference in the number of venting pipes needed?
 
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Old 04-03-08, 12:37 PM
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First off: I'd bet my 4 year old (there are days you could have her without a bet).. that your house is framed with 2X4's with brick on the outside and plaster/lath on the inside... time to knock a hole in it somewhere where the new cabinets will hide the demolition work....

Second - the number of vents is dictated (currently) by the distance from the main drain each individual fixture is located as well as the number of fixtures. I would bet (though 100years is a long time) that each room in question has, at minimum, one vent from the fixtures to the main vent/drain. You might want to invest $20 in a good DIY plumbing book to get the current requirements as well as the general principal behind venting/plumbing. Not only would it enlighten you, it might provide you with some ideas to plumb your current situation....

Knock out that a small section of wall behind the pipe (inconspiciously) - I almost 100% promise you'll find room to run your new pipes...... (almost... .. .. and I'll send the 4 Y.O. prepaid)..
 
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