quarter turn sillcock

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Old 05-06-08, 09:51 PM
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quarter turn sillcock

I recently saw a sillcock with a quarter turn feature. Are these new or I'm just living in a cave?

Sorry for being old fashioned, but this is the first time I have seen something that didn't take 25 turns to reach fully open.

Other than being for the 'too lazy to turn it 25 times' crowd, are these good for outdoor application?

I live in Colorado, where temps dip to below 30 three months out of the year, and I need to move a sillcock from the front to side of the house. What do I need to know to ensure I install it correctly? Pitch, length, optimal size, etc.?? The copper leading to the current sillcock is 1/2", but the sillcock is 3/4. Should I repipe so it is all 3/4?

Thanks for any and all help!

StrugglingDIY'r
 
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Old 05-07-08, 03:53 AM
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Quarter turn silcocks aren't "new", but are innovative. The most important thing to remember is to be sure to install the nylon shim that comes strapped to the sillcock on top of the flange. This will force the installation to be tilted downward toward the atmosphere. With this tilting, it will allow the water to exit the tube once you have turned it off, so it won't freeze. Most all are 3/4 OD, but you can sweat 1/2 inside. Just be sure to remove the stem before you sweat it all in. You can, of course use a 3/4 female to 1/2" reduction adapter to your existing 1/2 pipe.
 
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Old 05-07-08, 03:56 AM
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Ball type valves(quarter turn), are a big improvement over washer type valves. There is nothing to wear out or corrode, the ball us stainless and the seat is teflon. They will, however freeze and break like any other sillcock. Proper drainage and a shutoff are a must, but you must remember to shut it off and open the outside valve to protect it form freezing. I am not aware of a freeze free quarter-turn valve. Heat tape may also work to warm pipes close to the outside wall.
 
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Old 05-07-08, 12:21 PM
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The most important thing to remember is to be sure to install the nylon shim that comes strapped to the sillcock on top of the flange. This will force the installation to be tilted downward toward the atmosphere.
That works as long as the siding is plumb (straight up and down) but if you have beveled siding or even straight siding applied in a lapstrake manner the shim with the faucet will NOT be enough to have it be self-draining.
 
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Old 05-07-08, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
That works as long as the siding is plumb (straight up and down) but if you have beveled siding or even straight siding applied in a lapstrake manner the shim with the faucet will NOT be enough to have it be self-draining.
Good thought Furd. My house has lapped siding so I ripped a redwood wedge block on my table saw, attached it to the siding and then drilled it and installed new sillcocks. This moved the hose thread out about 3" from the siding, allows proper drainage and makes it less of a knuckle buster when attaching a hose.
 
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Old 05-07-08, 03:57 PM
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Bill, I may have misspoken, and thanks for the catch. There are 1/4 turn frost proof sillcocks, but not of the ball type you mentioned. Two different animals, so watch for the difference.
 
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Old 05-07-08, 08:51 PM
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Thanks guys. This is all good information.
 
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Old 05-09-08, 12:54 AM
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Indeed,


1/4 turn sillcocks are washerless ceramic valves most times, just like the B&K Quarter Master sillcock.


What's not good is B&K (Mueller) stopped selling these to Home Depot and now the industry has a bunch of faucets installed with no local ability to get repair parts. Not good.
 
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Old 05-25-09, 11:25 AM
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how to service a quarter turn sillcock (Mansfield?)

I think I have have a Mansfield Frost free sillcock (maybe 10-12"), has the following on the vaccum break cap: A.S.S.E.1019-A. Then a sybol, SA inside a big C

Anyway, the water flow from this faucet reduced suddenly and I suspect something is blocking inside (had something similar happen in shower, and when I removed the Moen cartridge, I found debris and susspect similar with the outside faucet.

Anyway, how do I remove the valve stem to check? I removed the handle, then the couple of fittings locking onto pipe. But unlike the rotating variety (remove the nut and the whole thing unscrews) it does not unscrew and I am afraid of putting to much torque and breaking the brass stem. There is a hole drilled through the brass stem near the handle, is this to attach something either to turn or pull?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-25-09, 07:33 PM
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Is it a Mansfield or a Moen faucet?


That hole....I'd like to know myself what it is for as well. Arrow Brass has a hole in their stems that will leak at times.
 
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Old 05-23-13, 08:56 PM
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Thanks for the details

Guys,

I really appreciate this thread. I'll summarize some things I've learned here or elsewhere on the 'net.

Sillcock = Hose Bibb (Bibb) (Sillcock sometimes implies a flange)

Copper pipe to thread usually matches diameter (1/2" copper pipe usually has 1/2" thread adapter soldered) - but measure twice and buy once

Frost proof sillcocks are designed to embed into your wall to keep the temperature-regulated water as close to the inside of the house.

"There are 1/4 turn frost proof sillcocks, but not of the ball type...Two different animals, so watch for the difference"

"Ball type valves(quarter turn), are a big improvement over washer type valves. There is nothing to wear out or corrode, the ball [is] stainless and the seat is teflon. They will, however freeze and break like any other sillcock."

"...force the installation to be tilted downward toward the atmosphere...[and] allow the water to exit the tube once you have turned it off, so it won't freeze"

I hope this helps others.

Steve
 
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Old 06-06-13, 07:18 PM
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I got tired of always having to bend down to turn on the hose (in garage), so I removed the frost free sillcock and put a 1/4 turn inline shutoff in the basement (with drain screw) and ran copper out through the wall and up to eye level with another 1/4 turn shutoff for a normal hose. I had to be careful every fall to drain the line to outside.

This worked fine for a couple of years, but then a contractor moved my interior inline shutoff - which had compression fittings - closer to the outside wall and soldered it in, and I think he over-heated it. I suspected it was letting some water seep into the outside line when I drained it this fall, and forgot to check it. Naturally, water got into the outside line, froze, and burst the (dry) pipe during the winter.

I now have another weekend project...which I could do without. I'm thinking I might use PEX from the new inline shutoff to the elbow fitting where the line goes out through the wall, as things are a bit tight up there and there are more wires now that the basement is finished.
 
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Old 06-06-13, 07:31 PM
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Thanks for the additional input. Thread is 4 yrs old.... Closing it. Start new thread please with any plumbing issues...
 
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