Sewage Ejector Kit Vent


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Old 07-04-08, 03:57 PM
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Sewage Ejector Kit Vent

I'm hoping someone in Ontario Canada can give me a little information on a sewage ejector kit I've installed in my basement for a bathroom/laundry tub.

I've been getting conflicting information on vent size....

Right now the basin is all installed and hooked into my sewer line (2" pump discharge with a check valve pumping into a 3" sewage line). The basin is equipped for a 3" vent line (3" threaded hole in top of basin to tie in vent line).

All my plumbing/drains are installed and cemented in (was that ever fun to work out that!).

Anyways, some people are saying a 2" vent line is fine and others are saying a 3" vent is needed. I'm now confused as to what I should do because if I have to go to 3" I'm gonna be up the creek I think. Can I go 2 1/2" etc? Once the basement bathroom gets done, I move on to my main bathroom upstairs where I have the lovely task of destroying the tile wall adhered to cement board....as bad as that is that lets me get inbetween the wall to pop a hole through the floor joist to run the basin vent from the basement out to get to the roof. This might make for tight quarters in the wall space putting a 3" line in there...because I'm pretty sure I'll have to put a coupling in which might put me thicker than the void wall space correct?

Also, with the basement bathroom vent on the plumbing lines themselves (sink, shower, toilet, laundry drain line), I can tie that into an existing bathroom vent but cannot tie that into the sewage basin vent correct?

I assume that is correct and I'm not too excited about that because I've got a 50yr aluminum roof and am leary about popping any new holes in it to run a dedicated vent to the basin.

I've been tempted to just run everything to the attic and tie it into the existing vent line but I know in the end I need to do it right so I'm just looking for a little guidance and maybe an idea or two to simplify this part of the installation. I don't plan on living in this house for more than 5 years so the next person moving in would be stuck with it although I've been stuck with plenty of idiotic surprises in this house since I moved in (like tieing in your sump pump into the sewer line...um duh!!!)

Aside from the labour involved (punching up the concrete floor and digging out the soil to install the basin, recementing etc) it's gone pretty smooth.
 
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Old 07-04-08, 06:11 PM
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First off, If I am not mistaken, you do not need a dedicated vent through the roof for a sump basin. It just needs to be tied into the existing venting system. Also, I have never run more than a 2" vent for the basin either. It cannot be less than 2" and the hole is probably 3" depending on the pump size you use. If you are using a standard sewer ejection pump for 1 bathroom, 2" should be fine.

BUT


This is all depending on your local codes.
I would check with your building official before getting to carried away. You can always anonymously ask questions over the phone, (in case you have not pulled a permit).
 
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Old 07-04-08, 06:18 PM
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and this is where the confusion grows....LOL

Part of it is my fault...I'm a bit of a perfectionist so I like to make sure things are done as close to right as they possibly are.

If I don't have to have a dedicated line then I have it made....bathroom/laundry plumbing vent and then the basin vent up into the void wall space of upstairs bath and tie it in right there!

I got a 3" vent line off the basin from a couple of people and it had me confused because the pump is only a 2" discharge, a 2" vent should suffice in equalling out that air pressure.

....and I so hate calling for help....LOL
 
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Old 07-04-08, 06:30 PM
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It is not a bad thing to try and do things correctly
and I commend that.
I am not sure if we have too many plumbers from Canada on here. But, I have only been with this group a few months.

If you lived in Manchester, NH USA, I could give you the right answer, but you are not only in another state, but another country, and I have no clue what your laws or codes are.

Good luck, and don't be afraid to ask your inspector for help.

We will always try to help here, but code issues are hard.
 
 

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