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Floodchek vs. stainless vs. rubber washing machine hose with Watts Intelliflow

Floodchek vs. stainless vs. rubber washing machine hose with Watts Intelliflow

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  #1  
Old 08-05-08, 01:53 PM
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Floodchek vs. stainless vs. rubber washing machine hose with Watts Intelliflow

I'm moving into a new house with a third floor laundry, and I'm really paranoid about avoiding floods. And I know my wife and I will not remember to turn off the washing machine supply valves.

I'm planning to install a Watts Intelliflow automatic shutoff valve (A2C-M1 valve with KA2-BD retrofit kit). I'm not sure what I should do about hoses though. I'd be glad to hear any thoughts on these choices:

1. Rubber hoses that come with machine. They have a 90* elbow/gooseneck on one end, which I think I'm going to need due to tight clearance. And besides the washer owner's manual says I should only use genuine LG hoses. Is this all I need since I'll have the fancy shutoff valve?

2. Braided stainless hoses. These can be had with the built-in gooseneck too (not sure how easy these are to find though).

3. Floodchek hoses, supposed to last 20 years (not too expensive here: http://www.lowcostlaundryequip.com/c...tem_num=183225). Are these really better than the stainless ones? These have straight connectors on them -- can I use any old brass elbow to get my 90* bend (like ones sold for RV water hookup)? What would the extra connections with the separate elbows do to my chances of a leak? I like the idea of not having to access the back of the machine to change hoses for a long long time.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts or advice.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-05-08, 02:06 PM
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Ditch the rubber. Or replace them every 5 years or so.

If yer a belt and suspenders guy go with the flood stop hoses, but be advised some folks have had issues if the water pressure is a bit high. Also I noticed a bit of reduced flow in my admittedly non-scientific test.

I'd go stainless with the auto shutoff valve myself. Does it have a battery backup?

More importantly, do you have the washer pan and drain installed?
 
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Old 08-05-08, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Ditch the rubber. Or replace them every 5 years or so.
Can I count on them not bursting for at least a couple of years? Aren't you supposed to replace the stainless ones every 5 years too?

If yer a belt and suspenders guy go with the flood stop hoses, but be advised some folks have had issues if the water pressure is a bit high. Also I noticed a bit of reduced flow in my admittedly non-scientific test.
I guess I am a belt and suspenders guy. But I'm not talking about the Watts FloodStop hoses (precisely because of the problem you mention), but Floodchek hoses that have no built-in valve, just (supposedly) superior construction.

I'd go stainless with the auto shutoff valve myself. Does it have a battery backup?
No, but I think the valves are off without power, so that's ok.

More importantly, do you have the washer pan and drain installed?
Yep, I think it's required by code and in any case the house will have it.

Speaking of the drain pan, I guess the Intelliflow's leak sensor should go on the floor outside the pan, since water outside the pan is a bigger concern than water in the pan.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 02:43 PM
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Ahhh thought Floodchek was the same thing as Floodstop...I see now.

I had stock rubber hoses on a machine for 10 yrs. They were still fine when I replaced them, though they did seem a little swollen at the fittings. Who knows how much longer they would have lasted. 'Course I doubt my parents ever replaced the hoses in 20+ years.

And yer right about the sensor. Unlikely you'd have an issue with a new washer. If you go away for a few days or week, then just hit the valves. Is it a lever action valve? Those are designed to be turned on and off. Training is the thing. Just put it on the vacation checklist along with turning down the water heater.

As to replacing the braided hoses every 5 yrs..personally I think thats overkill. They have a PVC inner tube and I think they're tested to what 1000 PSI or something? The washer will prob need replacinging before the hoses.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Is it a lever action valve? Those are designed to be turned on and off.
No, unfortunately each spigot has its own 1" lever. They look like they must be ball valves, though, so I guess at least that's good.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 10:58 AM
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Let me explain a few things here.

From what I have read, unless I missed something, The flood check hoses are not the same as the flood stop hoses for toilets and lavs. The flood check is jut a different composition of hose with no stopping device installed in the hose.

Secondly, I jumped right on the bandwagon when I first saw those Intellivalves, so I purchased one for a friend and installed it for him. Unfortunately he had brand new front load washer/dryer combination and because of the smart features in the washing machine, it would not fill the washer and we had to remove the Iintellivalve.

I would go with the braided lines or the flood check hoses and learn to shut off the washer after each use.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by plumbingods View Post
From what I have read, unless I missed something, The flood check hoses are not the same as the flood stop hoses for toilets and lavs. The flood check is jut a different composition of hose with no stopping device installed in the hose.
Correct. The only thing they have in common is the word "flood" in the name.

Secondly, I jumped right on the bandwagon when I first saw those Intellivalves, so I purchased one for a friend and installed it for him. Unfortunately he had brand new front load washer/dryer combination and because of the smart features in the washing machine, it would not fill the washer and we had to remove the Iintellivalve.
Interesting. Do you happen to remember what kind of machine it was? And did the Intelliflow have a leak sensor? The Watts website says "The new Intelliflow™ Models A2C-M1 and A2C-WB-M1 also include a leak sensor. The water sensor is placed on the floor behind the washing machine." Just wondering if there is a new version out that might work better.

The instructions warn that some new washers draw some current all the time, but that makes the valve stay open all the time, and there is a calibration procedure to teach the valve what the "off" current draw is so it will ignore that. If the valve behaves as advertised (and of course maybe it doesn't), the only way you should have experienced the problem you describe is if the machine draws more current when it's off than when it's filling. There is also an accessory called the Intellitimer which turns the water on for a while when you press a button. It's designed for combo washer/dryer units that only have a 240V plug (can't be plugged into the Intelliflow), but it could work as a backup plan if I got the unit and it didn't work with my washing machine.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 12:15 PM
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I just called my freind and they told me it was a Kenmore frontloader washing machine. I did not diagnose the problem, they had Sears come in twice and this is what Sears said. So I was asked to remove the valve, and never had a problem since. I don't know if they have changed the valve to update for newer machines yet.

It did have a leak sensor that plugged into the control.
 
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