Installing a backwater preventer

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  #1  
Old 12-03-08, 09:28 AM
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Installing a backwater preventer

Hey guys,

After the 3rd basement flood in 5 years due to sewage backup, I'm wanting to install a backwater valve on our main waste line (actually wanted to after the 1st, but the town was supposed to be replacing the sewer lines near our home). I had an estimate that was around $2200 and many other plumbers I've talked to seem to want to avoid this issue.

My question is, if I hire someone to locate all the lines in my basement and someone to cut the concrete, can I take on the installation of the valve myself or is it something I shouldn't mess with? I'd be doing the same thing that was quoted in our estimate, only saving a lot more money IMO.

I talked with the Department of Public Works for our town, and they do not require an inspection if this is done on the inside of the home.

Thanks in advance for any help and advice.
 
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Old 12-03-08, 08:37 PM
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What do you mean by locating all the lines in you basement? Aren't we talking about a check valve in the main drain? You should see a 4 inch cast iron pipe with a trap and a clean out. Do you see that?
 
  #3  
Old 12-04-08, 05:15 AM
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Yes, but I want to make sure I'm in front of all the lines connecting to the main drain. We have several floor drains in our basement, so I want to place the valve where it can protect all of those.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 06:59 AM
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As I said in another post on a similar question, I don't think those floor drains are tied into the main drain. They might be going to a dry well.
 
  #5  
Old 12-04-08, 01:10 PM
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Pretty sure ours are though because we get backwater from both the floor drains and the basement toilet during heavy rains.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 01:34 PM
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Do you have city sewers or cesspools in your area? If it's a city sewer system, there is no way a heavy rain should backup into a toilet.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 04:09 PM
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Originally Posted by milhouse View Post
Hey guys,

After the 3rd basement flood in 5 years due to sewage backup, I'm wanting to install a backwater valve on our main waste line...
but the town was supposed to be replacing the sewer lines near our home...
My question is, if I hire someone to locate all the lines in my basement and someone to cut the concrete...
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Obviously the sewer and storm drains are tied together at some point, besides, the town was going to replace the lines on the street, which would indicate something is not as it should be.

Originally Posted by Pulpo View Post
What do you mean by locating all the lines in you basement? Aren't we talking about a check valve in the main drain? You should see a 4 inch cast iron pipe with a trap and a clean out. Do you see that?
What does seeing it have to do with anything? Does it enter the floor? Where does the drain from the basement B/R go?

Originally Posted by milhouse View Post
Pretty sure ours are though because we get backwater from both the floor drains and the basement toilet during heavy rains.
There's the answer.

Originally Posted by Pulpo View Post
Do you have city sewers or cesspools in your area? If it's a city sewer system, there is no way a heavy rain should backup into a toilet.
Unless it was not hooked up properly.

We are trying to assist people with problems, not ignore what they are saying, and then argue with them. If he said he wanted to buy all the BW Valves in New Jersey, and nail them to his roof, who are we to question it?

This person seems to have a sense of what is happenning to the house they own. What is wrong with having a backflow preventer on both lines? Water damage will cost money as well as sewage.

Yes, in my opinion, i would pay someone to locate the lines, and tie in BWValves as needed. It would be a PIA but, in the long run it may pay to do it. If your TOWN is like my TOWN it could take a lifetime for them to do anything.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 04:43 PM
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My questions were clarification questions to help me form an opinion, since I'm not there to see it. If he really is dead set on a check valve, I won't stop him from installing it. I won't respond to your poor ANALogy of valves in New Jersey.
 
  #9  
Old 12-04-08, 07:47 PM
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I can't say I'm much of an expert on backwater valves... but before you go chipping up the basement I'd suggest at least considering whether you can install the check valve outside the house.

You should have a main cleanout somewhere inside or outside, and this would likely be the best place for the check valve. Remember, wherever it ends up, it will need to be accessible for occasional cleaning and possibly repair.
 
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