What size snake?

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Old 12-04-08, 01:35 PM
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What size snake?

I have a clog 88 feet from my house in the buried two inch flexible pipe that runs fresh water from my cistern to my house. Would it be better to buy a 100 foot 1/2 inch manual snake form Cobra, or two fifty foot 3/8 inch joinable [extendable] sections? I have a straight shot into the pipe, but I am looking for advice on ease of use, and whether the 3/8 inch would be strong enough to use that far. I suspect a silt buildup is the problem, and digging and cutting the pipe is my last resort..
 
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Old 12-04-08, 02:00 PM
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I've never heard of using a snake in a supply line and I doubt that a 3/8 or 1/2 inch snake could do anything in a 2 inch pipe.

How did you determine that the clog is exactly 88 feet from the house and why do you think it is just silt?

Since you mention cistern I suspect this is just gravity flow. Can you connect a pump and pressurize the line to blow out the clog, either forward or backward? Sometimes an object called a "pig" is blown through a pipe to clear it.
 
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Old 12-04-08, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by johnmurrjr View Post
I have a clog 88 feet from my house in the buried two inch flexible pipe that runs fresh water from my cistern to my house. Would it be better to buy a 100 foot 1/2 inch manual snake form Cobra, or two fifty foot 3/8 inch joinable [extendable] sections? I have a straight shot into the pipe, but I am looking for advice on ease of use, and whether the 3/8 inch would be strong enough to use that far. I suspect a silt buildup is the problem, and digging and cutting the pipe is my last resort..
using a snake on pottable water lines in not a good idea. They can be used but normaly has a last resort. Like one poster suggested try to use air to blow out the problem. or take the pipe apart. Basically you don't want anything to contaimate your pottable water supply like a snake has the possiablity of doing
 
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Old 12-05-08, 01:35 PM
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I don't know that it being potable water would make any difference, but as I've dealt with various problems in my drain lines, I've come to swear by the Drain King hose attachments. It seems to me that if you could get to one end or the other, you could slip one of the smaller models into the line and probably blow the clog in the other direction, all for about ten bucks from most hardware stores.
 
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