Mom new to plumbing - hot water baseboard heat PSI

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Old 12-19-08, 06:17 PM
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Mom new to plumbing - hot water baseboard heat PSI

I bled the hot water heat baseboard pipes, and I think I might have let too much air out. Now there is no heat and I don't hear the water running through the baseboards. How much pressure is supposed to be in the tank? Is it 15 or 20 PSI? Can I use a tire gauge to check it? I'm sure there is no more air in the lines....
 
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Old 12-20-08, 11:32 AM
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Is this a blonde joke ?

Just kidding

You can never let too much air out of the heating loops. An average home with a basement and 2 floors above should run around 12-15psi. A little over will not hurt, but too much, 25psi or more, will cause other problems such as thermal expansion causing the relief valve to drip or blow off intermittently. The relief valve is designed to release pressure at 30psi max.

Could you have accidentally left a valve closed when purging the air from the boiler? Is all the power turned on?
Please explain in detail how you let the air out of the heating pipes.

More info would help out here, and maybe some pictures too.
 
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Old 12-21-08, 08:29 AM
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Reply to plumingods...

I bled the air from the valve at the elbow on the baseboard itself. I didn't do anything at the tank. All the power is on. Could it be frozen? I don't have a basement, just a little underground 8 x 10 space for everything, and about 2 weeks ago two of the pipes broke and had to be replaced under the house (pipes from this heating system), and they worked for one day after it was replaced. That's why I thought it had an air lock and bled the lines. If it IS frozen, how the heck am I going to know where and how to thaw it out? Should I put a milkhouse heater in the space (and watch it carefully)?
 
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Old 12-21-08, 12:52 PM
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There is a pressure/temperature gauge on the boiler, what is it reading?

When you got air out of the elbow(s), did any water come out?

If it has frozen once and it is cold enough, it could be frozen again. But we cannot rule out the possibility of air in the main lines. Those are usually purged from a purge valve on the boiler. If you feel the boiler feed and return lines, are they hot or cold? How many radiators are not working?
How easy is it to get to those pipes in the crawl space?
If you can put some heat down there safely, you may want to try that.
Do you have snow yet? If so, shoveling snow piles up against the foundation or skirting (if a mobile home), will help insulate and stop air from blowing into the area that freezes regularly.
 
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Old 12-21-08, 03:42 PM
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Where is the valve?

Water did come out of the valves on each baseboard. I did shovel snow up against the house like you said, all the way around (it is 10 below 0 today here - northern Wisconsin). The water is not circulating through the pipes. Where is the purge valve on the boiler? What does it look like? I really think it is frozen somewhere. There is a very low crawl space under the house and I don't really think I could get a heater all the way under there - but I could put in under the house and just let it heat up the underneath - do you think that would work? I'm trying everything you say...and I would like to try the boiler valve yet, and if that doesn't work, I'm going to have to live with the wood stove I guess....and no back up heat - eek.
 
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Old 01-13-09, 03:06 PM
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Dear Pluming God...

Thank you for your suggestions, especially the one about banking up the house, as it turns out it WAS frozen and on the first warmer day I put the heater underneath and it thawed out. Had one cracked pipe which I replaced with PVC instead of copper, and all is well and working again. Thank you so much!Beer 4U2
 
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Old 01-13-09, 03:37 PM
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Hello again,

I truly am sorry I missed the previous post with all those questions, but I was recovering from a medical issue and was not on much then.

I am glad to hear that all has worked out OK.

I am a little concerned that you said you fixed the problem with PVC piping. Are you sure that it is PVC and not CPVC or PEX? I don't think regular PVC will last very long with the expansion and contraction of the piping along with the high temperatures. I also think that PVC will break easy when frozen.

It may be something to change in the warmer temps when heat is not so critical.
 
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