High Water Pressure

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Old 01-27-09, 10:52 AM
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High Water Pressure

I am having issues with the water pressure in my system climbing too high. My home is raised foundation with all of the plumbing running underneath. The water heater is also located under the house.

I was first alerted to the issue by the T&P valve weeping. I replaced the valve and the weeping resolved, or so I thought.

A few weeks later I was near the outlet for the T&P and noticed weeping again. Since I just purchased the house, there is an insurance policy to cover this kind of thing. I called the plumber, he came out and decided that the T&P needed to be replaced. A week later I noticed the valve leaking again. The plumber said I should get a pressure guage and check the pressure.

Found that the incoming pressure to the house from the utility is 140 PSI and there is a pressure regulator that brings it down to 55 PSI. Put the guage on the hose bib (after regulator) and left it there overnight. The high indicator read 140 PSI. Called the plumber and he said he would come out and replace the pressure regulator, as it must be bad. He replaced the regulator however, the pressure still climbs to 140 PSI overnight.

Anyone have any suggestions???
Like the emoticon, I feel like I'm beating my head against the wall. I appreciate any input.
 
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Old 01-27-09, 04:20 PM
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140# is enough to cause lots of problems. If the plumber replaced the regulator, then it sounds like he needs to come back. It seems it is not working.
 
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Old 01-27-09, 04:34 PM
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Bill, Thanks for the answer but, I don't think the pressure regulator is the problem. I find highly unlikely that both the one he replaced and the new regulator are not functioning exactly alike.

My thoughts are running to the fact that the water heater is causing the pressure build up as it is after the pressure regulator. I may be way off base but, that's what I'm thinking.

I have read elsewhere that the water heater can cause the pressure to build but I have not been able to find a solution.
 
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Old 01-27-09, 04:54 PM
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Install an overpressure tank on the cold water side of the water heater to take up some of the pressure on the hot water side. Cold water, call the plumber back.
 
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Old 01-27-09, 07:38 PM
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why not put the gauge back on the hose bib before bed...shut off the main water supply and lock the pressure in the system...if it is your hot water tank the pressure should build up (maybe not tothe 140 psi but it should climb well above the normal 55 if it is in fact the reason for your pressure build up..if no build up or in fact a loss of pressure (due to any small leak) then you should forget about the hot water tank and get another regulator?

i am on a well system and never have a pressure build up so maybe i am way off here but it sounds logical to me
 
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Old 01-28-09, 12:04 PM
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You also need to find out if your system has a backflow preventor in it. Most codes now require them, and many pressure regulators have them built in.

If your home does, but does NOT have an expansion tank to 'soak up' the excess pressure caused by the water heater, then you will experience the exact symptoms you are describing.

You should also consider installing a pressure relief valve and set it for around 100 psi. Then no matter what, the valve will open when pressure exceeds this amount, this could save your homes plumbing and expensive water damage.
 
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Old 01-28-09, 09:00 PM
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ok having a pressure regulator (prv) on your system means it has no where to vent the extra pressure created by heating the water. as mentioned earlier you need an expansion tank installed. the system does not care where it is installed at as long as it is past the prv, it is usually installed on the cold inlet to the water heater 1 because of convienence and 2 because the hot water will make the rubber bladder fail sooner than teh cold water will. i would have a different plumber do this as the first plumber ddint even troubleshoot why the t&p was venting. it seems to me all 3 were working just fine and doing their intended job by relieving the high pressure
 
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Old 01-29-09, 04:45 AM
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But since this is a diy forum, and installing the expansion tank doesn't require a rocket science degree (that your first plumber obviously didn't have), you can do it yourself and forget the plumber. Instructions are pretty clear that come with the tank. Let us know if we can help with the install.
 
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Old 01-29-09, 10:35 AM
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Thanks to all of you for your replies.
After doing some research and reading the replies here, I am of the opinion that I need to install an expansion tank.

Since the PRV makes mine a closed system there is no where for the pressure to go when the water heater calls for heat, thus raising the pressure in the whole system.

I also agree with all of you who said the plumber failed to fully troubleshoot the initial problem. Being a service electrician, I know firsthand that you have to look at all of the possibilities to get to the root of the problem. Seems to me that he should have realized, once he knew there was a PRV that the problem is being caused by the heating of the water and not a bad regulator.

I will get an expansion tank and install it. If I have any problems or questions, I know where to come to get the answers.

Again, Thanks to all of you!
Beer 4U2
 
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Old 01-30-09, 11:38 AM
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heres a good look at what a bad/no t&p can do

YouTube - Mythbusters water heater
 
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Old 02-04-09, 08:38 PM
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expansion tank

Sounds like you have a similar problem to one I just finished two days ago. I soldered a tee into the cold water supply at the hot water heater. Added a shut off and expansion tank ( small 2 gallon amtrol therm x trol and two days later and no PRV leaks ( knock on wood). I'm about as far from being a proficient plumber as can be and it was not problem... This forum is great for help- thats where I got it!
 
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